Home >> Learn English >> Class 8>>

This is Jody’s Fawn, Class 8 CBSE English Lesson Summary, Explanation

By Ruchika Gupta

 

This is Jody’s Fawn, CBSE Class 8 English Honeydew Book Lesson 6 Explanation, Summary, Difficult words

 

This is Jody’s Fawn Class 8 English Honeydew Book Lesson 6 - Detailed explanation of the lesson along with the meanings of difficult words. Also, the explanation is followed by a Summary of the lesson. All the exercises and Question and Answers given at the back of the lesson have been covered.

Class 8 English (Honeydew Book) Chapter 6 - This is Jody’s Fawny

By Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

this is jody's fawn

 

This is Jody’s Fawn- Introduction to the lesson

The lesson “This is Jody’s Fawn” by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings revolves around the fawn whose mother was killed to use its liver and heart to extract poison out of Jody’s father Penny and save his life after a snakebite. It begins with Jody convincing his Pa to bring the fawn home and raise it, then his ma and then finally going with Mill-wheel to search for it. The lesson takes you through Jody’s journey, from finding the fawn till taking it home with him.

 

Class 08th English Lessons Class 08th English MCQ Take Free MCQ Test English
Class 08th Science Lessons   Take Free MCQ Test Science
Class 08th Hindi Lessons   Take Free MCQ Test Hindi
CBSE CLASS 08th Social Science Lessons Take Free MCQ Test History

 

This is Jody’s Fawn- Summary

 

The lesson “This is Jody’s Fawn” begins with Jody being unable to keep the fawn out of his mind. He expresses his concern to his father, Penny who was resting as he had just been saved from death. He was bitten by a snake and Jody killed a doe to use it’s heart and liver to extract poison out of his father. The doe had a fawn and Jody was worried about it. He wanted to bring it home and raise it. Penny thought it would be ungrateful of them to leave the fawn to starve and thus, he agreed. Next, Jody convinces his mother about the same, who at first is reluctant but on hearing the views of Mill-wheel and Doc Wilson, agrees to let Jody bring it home. She was okay with it if Jody would give it his share of milk as they had nothing else to feed the fawn. Mill-wheel gave Jody a ride on his horse and suddenly Jody realised he did not want company. He did not want anyone to see his disappointment if he was unable to find the fawn and on the other hand, he did not want to share his loving moment on finding it either. Thus, he sent Mill-wheel away. He begins searching for the fawn and sees a group of buzzards near the killed doe who he scares away by throwing a bough. He continues searching and finally finds the fawn looking at him with his bright eyes. At first, Jody hesitated to go near him and only extended a hand to caress him but it was only when the fawn brought itself near him, he carried it. He carried it through the clearing and reached the intersection road towards home. He kept it down to take rest but the fawn cried. He remembered that his father told him that a fawn will follow you once you carry it first for a while. On the way home, he carried it for some time and let it follow him for a while. They finally reached home and Jody wanted to show his father that the fawn followed him but the fawn refused to climb the stairs. He carried it up the steps and his father could see Jody’s happiness through his bright eyes. Jody then took it to the kitchen to feed it his share of milk. He fed it the milk patiently till the gourd was left empty.

This is Jody’s Fawn- Lesson and Explanation

Every Monday, on his way back from work, Bepin Choudhury would drop in at Kalicharan's in New Market to buy books. Crime stories, ghost stories and thrillers. He had to buy at least five at a time to last him through the week. He lived alone, was not a good mixer, had few friends, and didn’t like spending time in idle chat. Today, at Kalicharan’s, Bepin Babu had the feeling that someone was observing him from close quarters. He turned round and found himself looking at a round faced, meek looking man who now broke into a smile. “I don’t suppose you recognise me.”

Jody allowed his thoughts to drift back to the fawn. He could not keep it out of his mind. He had held it, in his dreams, in his arms. He slipped from the table and went to his father’s bedside. Penny lay at rest. His eyes were open and clear, but the pupils were still dark and dilated. Jody said,
“How are you feeling, Pa?”
“Just fine, son. Old Death has gone thieving elsewhere. But wasn’t it a close shave!”
“I agree.” Penny said, “I’m proud of you, boy, the way you kept your head and did what was needed.”

Drift back to- go back to
Fawn- a young deer in its first year
Dilated- enlarged
Thieving- the action of stealing
A close shave- a narrow escape
Kept your head- stayed calm in a difficult situation

Jody could not help but think about the fawn again and again no matter how much he tried not to. He held him in his arms in his dreams. He finally got up from the table to go to his father’s bedside where his father, Penny was resting. His eyes were open and seemed clear but the pupils were still dark and enlarged. Jody asked his father how he was feeling. His father replied that he felt just fine. He further added that it was a narrow escape from death, which seems to have gone stealing elsewhere. Jody agreed. Penny expressed how proud he was of Jody for how he did not lose his cool and did what was necessary while staying calm.

“Pa-”
“Yes, son.”
“Pa, do you recollect the doe and the fawn?”
“I can never forget them. The poor doe saved me, that’s certain.”
“Pa, the fawn may be out there yet. It might be hungry and very scared.”
“I suppose so.”
“Pa, I’m a big boy now and don’t need to drink milk. Why don’t I go and see if I can find the fawn?”
“And bring it here?”
“And raise it.”
Penny lay quiet, staring at the ceiling. “Boy, you’ve got me hemmed in.”
“It won’t take much to raise it, Pa. It’ll soon start eating leaves and acorns.”
“You are smarter than boys of your age.”
“We took its mother, and it wasn’t to blame.”
“Surely it seems ungrateful to leave it to starve. Son, I can’t say ‘No’ to you. I never thought I’d live to see another day.”

Doe- a female deer
Hemmed in- (here) caught in a situation where one can’t say no
Acorns- small brown nuts

 

 

He then asks his father if he still remembered the doe and the fawn. To which, Penny replied that he can never forget about the poor Doe that saved his life. Jody expressed his concern regarding the fawn who might still be out there, hungry and frightened as he was separated from his mother. His father agreed. Jody further adds that he can take care of him and he does not need to drink milk as he is a grown-up boy now. He asked his father if he could go and look out for the fawn. His father asks if Jody wanted to bring the fawn at their place to which Jody agreed and added that he wanted to raise it too.
As his father looked at the ceiling, he expressed how Jody has put him in a situation where he is unable to say ‘no’. Jody tried to convince him further by pointing out that it would not require a lot of efforts to raise it and it will soon grow up to eat leaves and acorns. Penny added how Jody was brighter than the boys of his age. Jody mentioned that it was them who took its mother and now it will suffer because of them even though it is not to be blamed. His father expressed how ungrateful it would be to let him starve. Penny could not say ‘no’ to Jody as he had lost all hope of living to see another day.

“Can I ride back with Mill-wheel and see if I can find it?”
“Tell your Ma I said you can go.”

Jody asked his father if he could ride back with Mill-wheel to try and find the fawn. His father agreed and told Jody to convey to his mom that he has given him the required permission.

He sidled back to the table and sat down. His mother was pouring coffee for everyone. He said, “Ma, Pa says I can go bring back the fawn.” She held the coffee pot in mid-air. “What fawn?” “The fawn belonging to the doe we killed. We used the doe’s liver to draw out the poison and save Pa.” She gasped. “Well, for pity sake—” “Pa says it would be ungrateful to leave it to starve.” Doc Wilson said, “That’s right, Ma’am. Nothing in the world comes quite free. The boy’s right and his daddy’s right.” Mill-wheel said, “He can ride back with me. I’ll help him find it.” She set down the pot helplessly. “Well, if you’ll give it your milk—we’ve got nothing else to feed it.

” Sidled back- walked back quietly, trying not to be noticed Gasped- catch one’s breath with an open mouth, owing to pain or astonishment

Jody went back to the table in a manner to avoid getting noticed. He told his mother while she poured coffee for everyone that his father has given him permission to bring the fawn. On hearing this, she paused and held the coffee pot in the air and asked which fawn is he talking about. Jody informs her that he intends on bringing the fawn that belonged to the doe they killed to save his father’s life. He further explained that they used doe’s liver to extract poison to save his father. She heaved a sigh as she said that he can bring him home out of pure compassion. Jody told her that his father thinks it would be ungrateful and unappreciative of them to let the fawn starve.
Doctor Wilson kept his view forward by agreeing with what Jody and his father said. He thought both of them were right. He further added that there is nothing you can get from the world for free. Mill-wheel volunteered to give Jody a ride and help him find the fawn. On hearing all this, Jody’s mother felt helpless as she sat down. Even though she was not in favor of it, she knew they were right and thus agreed if Jody would give the fawn his share of milk as they had nothing else to feed it.

mill wheel

Mill-wheel said, “Come on, boy. We’ve got to get riding.”
Ma Baxter asked anxiously, “You’ll not be gone long?”
Jody said, “I’ll be back before dinner for sure.”
Mill-wheel mounted his horse and pulled Jody up behind him. He said to Mill-wheel, “Do you think the fawn’s still there? Will you help me find him?” “We’ll find him if he’s alive. How you know it’s a he?”
“The spots were all in a line. On a doe-fawn, Pa says the spots are every which way…”

Mounted- riding an animal, typically a horse
Every which way-in different directions

As soon as his mother agreed, Mill-wheel asked Jody to come along and said that they needed to go. Jody’s mother Baxter quite uneasily asked for reassurance that he will not be gone for long. Jody replied that he would be back before dinner. Mill-wheel climbed his horse and helped Jody sit behind him. Jody asked Mill-wheel if he thinks the fawn would still be there and if he will help Jody in finding him. Mill-wheel assured him that they would find the fawn if it was alive. However, he asked Jody how he knew it was a male. Jody told Mill-wheel that he is sure because his spots were all in a line. His father had told him that a doe-fawn or a female deer has spots in different directions.

II 

Jody gave himself over to thoughts of the fawn. They passed the abandoned clearing. He said, “Cut to the north, Mill-wheel. It was up here that Pa got bitten by the snake and killed the doe and I saw the fawn.” Suddenly Jody was unwilling to have Mill-wheel with him. If the fawn was dead, or could not be found, he could not have his disappointment seen. And if the fawn was there, the meeting would be so lovely and so secret that he could not endure to share it.

Gave himself over to- to spend all your time and energy doing or feeling something
Abandoned- having been deserted or left
Clearing- an open space in a forest, especially one cleared for cultivation
Endure- (here) handle

Jody engaged himself in thinking about the fawn. They crossed a deserted piece of land in the forest. Jody gave directions as he told Mill-wheel to turn towards the north where Penny got bitten by a snake. He had killed the doe and seen the fawn there only. All of a sudden, Jody became unwilling to be with Mill-wheel. He wondered if the fawn was dead or could not be found, he did not want Mill-wheel to see his disappointment. On the other hand, if he found the fawn, the union would be so lovely and personal that he could not bring himself to share it.

He said, “It’s not far now, but the scrub is very thick for a horse. I can make it on foot.”
“But I’m afraid to leave you, boy. Suppose you got lost or got bitten by the snake, too?”
“I’ll take care. It might take me a long time to find the fawn, if he’s wandered. Leave me off right here.” “All right, but you take it easy now. You know north here, and east?”
“There, and there. That tall pine makes a bearing.”
“So long.”
“So long, Mill-wheel. I’m obliged.”

Scrub- small form of a plant
Wander- to roam
Makes a bearing- acts as a compass and helps to identify directions
Obliged- be grateful


>Jody told Mill-wheel that the point where he saw the fawn is not very far now. Jody suggested that he would go on by foot as the scrubs ahead are very thick for a horse. Mill-wheel was afraid to leave Jody alone as what would happen if he got lost or bitten by a snake too. Jody assures him that he will handle it and also that it might take a while for him to find the fawn in case he’s wandered further. He told Mill-wheel to leave him nearby. Mill-wheel follows his direction and advises him to take it easy. He asks Jody if he is aware where the north and east was. Jody told him by pointing out the directions that he knows and that the tall pine acts as a compass that helps in identifying directions. Mill-wheel remarks that the pine is so long to which Jody agrees and expresses his gratefulness.

He waited for the sound of the hooves to end, then cut to the right. The scrub was still. Only his own crackling of twigs sounded across the silence. He wondered for an instant if he had mistaken his direction. Then a buzzard rose in front of him and flapped into the air. He came into the clearing under the oaks. Buzzards sat in a circle around the carcass of the doe. They turned their heads on their long scrawny necks and hissed at him. He threw his bough at them and they flew into an adjacent tree. The sand showed large cat prints but the big cats killed fresh, and they had left the doe to the carrion birds.

Hooves- the horny part of the foot of a horse
Crackling- sharp sound
Twigs- a slender woody shoot growing from a branch or stem of a tree or shrub
Buzzard- a large hawk like bird of prey with broad wings and a rounded tail, often seen soaring in wide circles
Flapped- (of a bird) move (its wings) up and down when flying or preparing to fly; flutter
Scrawny- thin and bony
Hissed- make a sharp sibilant sound as of the letter s
Adjacent- nearby
Bough- a main branch of a tree

Jody waited for the sound of hooves to end and let the horse go a bit far and then take a right. The scrub that was in front of him stood still. Only the sound of a few twigs could be heard in the silence. Jody doubted for a second if he had mistaken his direction. A large bird, like a vulture appeared in front of him and fluttered into the air. He came to the abandoned clearing from under the oaks. They sat in a circle around the doe that laid dead. They looked at him with their heads that laid on their long necks and hissed at him. Jody threw his bough at them and they flew into a nearby tree. The sand showed marks of large cat footprints who had killed it recently and had left the doe for the carrion birds.

He parted the grass at the place where he had seen the fawn. It did not seem possible that it was only yesterday. The fawn was not there. He circled the clearing. There was no sound, no sign. The buzzards clacked their wings, impatient to return to their business. He returned to the spot where the fawn had emerged and dropped on all fours, studying the sand for the small hoof prints. The night’s rain had washed away all tracks except those of cats and buzzards.

Clacked- make a sharp sound or series of noises

Jody separated the grass from the place where he saw the fawn the previous day. He could not believe it had just been a day. The fawn was not at that place. Jody searched the abandoned land but there was no sign and sound of one. On the other hand, the buzzards made sound with their wings out of desperation to resume what they were doing. Jody began looking at the place where the fawn had appeared from and began reading the small hoof prints in the sand but the rain from last night had washed away all tracks except for cats and buzzards.

III

jody

 

Movement directly in front of him startled him so that he tumbled backward. The fawn lifted its face to his. It turned its head with a wide, wondering motion and shook him through with the stare of its liquid eyes. It was quivering. It made no effort to rise or run. Jody could not trust himself to move He whispered, “It’s me.” The fawn lifted its nose, scenting him. He reached out one hand and laid it on the soft neck. The touch made him delirious. He moved forward on all fours until he was close beside it. He put his arms around its body. A light convulsion passed over it but it did not stir.

 

Class 08th English Lessons Class 08th English MCQ Take Free MCQ Test English
Class 08th Science Lessons   Take Free MCQ Test Science
Class 08th Hindi Lessons   Take Free MCQ Test Hindi
CBSE CLASS 08th Social Science Lessons Take Free MCQ Test History

 

Startled- feeling or showing sudden shock or alarm
Tumbled- having fallen or collapsed
Quivering- trembling or shaking with a slight rapid motion
Delirious- (here) extremely excited
Convulsion- shiver

Jody was shocked after having experienced some movement in front of him and he fell backwards. It was the fawn. The fawn lifted his face with a wide and wondering motion to see Jody and stared at him with his liquid eyes that it left Judy shook. The fawn was shaking with a slight rapid motion. The fawn sat still and made no effort to run. On the other hand, Jody could not move too but he whispered lightly, “It’s me”. The fawn sniffled and smelled him. Jody reached out with his hand and laid it on his soft neck. His touch made the fawn excited and he moved forward in an attempt to be close to Jody. Jody put his arms around the fawn which made the fawn shiver slightly but he did not stir which means he was not frightened, but comforted.

He stroked its sides as gently as though the fawn were a china deer and he might break it. Its skin was very soft. It was sleek and clean and had a sweet scent of grass. He rose slowly and lifted the fawn from the ground. Its legs hung limply. They were surprisingly long and he had to hoist the fawn as high as possible under his arm..

China deer- a clay deer that is easily broken
Sleek- smooth and shiny
Limply- lacking stiffness
Hoist- an act of raising or lifting something

Jody caressed the sides of his body so gently as if it were as fragile as a china deer. The fawn was soft, sleek and clean and even possessed a pleasant scent of grass. Jody lifted the fawn from the ground in a way that hung his limbs in the air. The fawn’s legs were quite long so Jody had to hold him as high as possible under his arm.

He was afraid that it might kick and bleat at sight and smell of its mother. He skirted the clearing and pushed his way into the thicket. It was difficult to fight through with his burden. The fawn’s legs caught in the bushes and he could not lift his own with freedom. He tried to shield its face from prickling vines. Its head bobbed with his stride. His heart thumped with the marvel of its acceptance of him. He reached the trail and walked as fast as he could until he came to the intersection with the road home. He stopped to rest and set the fawn down on its dangling legs. It wavered on them. It looked at him and bleated.

Bleat- the weak, wavering cry made by a sheep, goat, or calf.
Thicket- a dense group of bushes or trees
Vines- climbing or trailing woody-stemmed plant related to the grapevine
Stride- walk with long, decisive steps in a specified direction
Dangling- hanging or swinging loosely
Wavered- move in a quivering way; flicker
Bleated- make a characteristic weak, waving cry

 

 

He said, enchanted, “I’ll carry you after I get my breath.” He remembered his father saying that a fawn would follow if it had first been carried. He started away slowly. The fawn stared after him. He came back to it and stroked it and walked away again. It took a few wobbling steps toward him and cried piteously. It was willing to follow him. It belonged to him. It was his own. He was light-headed with his joy. He wanted to fondle it, to run and romp with it, to call to it to come to him. He dared not alarm it. He picked it up and carried it in front of him over his two arms. It seemed to him that he walked without effort.

Enchanted- filled with delight, charmed
Stroked- move one’s hands gently over a surface, repeatedly; caress
Wobbling- move unsteadily in a particular direction (particularly from side to side)
Fondle- Stroke or caress lovingly
Light-headed- Unable to think clearly
Romp- play
Alarm- frighten

Jody, filled with delight as he was, told the fawn that he would carry it once he had taken a bit of rest. Jody recalled that his father had told him that a fawn will follow you once you have carried it for a bit first. Jody started walking at a slow pace and the fawn looked as he walked further. Jody came back again to caress it and went forward again. This time, the fawn took a few weak steps in Jody’s direction as he cried. Although wobbling, Jody was overjoyed by the fact that it was willing to go with him which made the fawn his own. He was so overjoyed that he could not even think properly and clearly. At that moment, Jody wanted to caress it with all his desire, play with it and call it towards him but he did not want to frighten it. Then he picked the fawn again in his arms and walked effortlessly (or at least that is what he thought).

His arms began to ache and he was forced to stop again. When he walked on, the fawn followed him at once. He allowed it to walk a little distance, then picked it up again. The distance home was nothing. He could have walked all day and into the night, carrying it and watching it follow. He was wet with sweat but a light breeze blew through the June morning, cooling him. The sky was as clear as spring water in a blue china cup. He came to the clearing. It was fresh and green after the night’s rain. He fumbled with the latch and was finally obliged to set down the fawn to manage it. Then, he had an idea — he would walk into the house, into Penny’s bedroom, with the fawn walking behind him. But at the steps, the fawn balked and refused to climb them. He picked it up and went to his father. Penny lay with closed eyes.

Balked- was unwilling

Jody stopped unwillingly as his arms had started aching. The fawn followed him as he walked again. Jody would only allow the fawn to walk a few steps and then pick it up again. Home was almost near. Jody could have picked it up and watched it follow all day but he was tired and sweating. A light breeze helped him dry his sweat on that June morning. The sky was so clear that it had been compared to spring water in a blue china cup. He reached the clearing at last which was green and fresh after the showers last night. It was a bit difficult for him to open the latch of the house but he could do it once he set the fawn down. At first, he thought of making the fawn follow directly into Penny’s room and surprise him. But the fawn refused to climb the stairs so Jody had to pick him up to his father’s bedroom. His dad was resting with closed eyes.

Jody called, “Pa! Look!” Penny turned his head. Jody stood beside him, the fawn clutched hard against him. It seemed to Penny that the boy’s eyes were as bright as the fawn’s. He said, “I’m glad you found him.”

Clutched- to grasp something tightly

Jody woke his father up and stood beside as Penny turned his head towards him. The fawn grasped him firmly. Penny could see Jody’s eyes as bright and glowing as the fawn’s. Penny expressed his happiness over Jody having been able to find the fawn.

Jody then went to the kitchen. The fawn wobbled after him. A pan of morning’s milk stood in the kitchen safe. The cream had risen on it. He skimmed the cream into a jug. He poured milk into a small gourd. He held it out to the fawn. It butted it suddenly, smelling the milk. He saved it precariously from spilling over the floor. It could make nothing of the milk in the gourd.

Jody went straight to the kitchen after that and the fawn followed him with his weak steps. In the kitchen, a pan filled with morning’s milk was kept reserved but cream had formed on it. He skimmed the cream and put it into a jug while he poured the milk in a utensil made of small gourd. The fawn sniffed the milk as Jody saved the milk from being spilled. The fawn could not drink the milk out of the gourd.

jody fawn

He dipped his fingers in the milk and thrust them into the fawn’s soft wet mouth. It sucked greedily. When he withdrew them, it bleated frantically and butted him. He dipped his fingers again and as the fawn sucked, he lowered them slowly into the milk. The fawn blew and sucked and snorted. It stamped its small hoofs impatiently. As long as he held his fingers below the level of the milk, the fawn was content. It closed its eyes dreamily. It was ecstasy to feel its tongue against his hand. Its

Frantically- in a hurried, excited or disorganised manner
Butted- hit something with the head or horns
Ecstasy- an overwhelming feeling of great happiness or joyful excitement
Gurgling- making or characterised by a hollow bubbling sound

So, Jody dipped his fingers in the milk and put them in its soft wet mouth, instantly which the fawn sucked greedily. He was hungry, which is why when Jody took his fingers out of its mouth, it cried and hit him with his head. The next time Jody put his fingers in the fawn’s mouth, he gently lowered it so as to bring it near the utensil. The fawn became impatient, blew the milk as he sucked it and made sounds. The fawn was calm till Jody kept his fingers inside the milk and he drank with eyes closed in satisfaction. Jody felt overwhelmed on feeling its tongue against his hand as his small tail moved back and forth. The milk disappeared quickly forming foam, which was marked by a bubbling sound.

 

This is Jody’s Fawn- Question and Answers

1. What had happened to Jody’s father?
A. In this story, Jody’s father had been bitten by a rattlesnake.

2. How did the doe save Penny’s life?
A. Jody killed a doe to use its heart and liver to extract poison out of Penny. This is how the doe saved Penny’s life.

3. Why does Jody want to bring the fawn home?
A. The doe Jody had killed to extract poison out of Penny and save his father’s life had a fawn. Jody wondered that the fawn must be lost and hungry without his mother. Thus, Jody wanted to bring the fawn home to raise him as he felt responsible to take care of him.

4. How does Jody know that the fawn is a male?
A. Jody was sure that the fawn was a male because the spots on the fawn were all in a line and his father had told him that a female deer or doe-fawn has spots going in different directions.

5. Jody didn’t want Mill-wheel with him for two reasons. What were they?
A. Jody became unwilling to be with Mill-wheel because of two reasons. He wondered if the fawn was dead or could not be found, he did not want Mill-wheel to see his disappointment. On the other hand, if he found the fawn, the union would be so lovely and personal that he could not bring himself to share it.

6. Why was Mill-wheel afraid to leave Jody alone?
A. Mill-wheel was afraid to leave Jody alone as he was worried about what would happen if he got lost or bitten by a snake too.

7. How did Jody bring the fawn back home?
A. Jody carried the fawn for a while and then stood for a while to take rest as he kept the fawn on the ground. He remembered that his father had told him a fawn would follow you if you had carried him first for a while. so , for some distance, Jody let it follow him. But as he wobbled, Jody kept picking him up and carrying it too. This is how they reached home.

8. Jody was filled with emotion after he found the fawn. Can you find at least three words or phrases which show how he felt?
A. Jody was filled with emotion after he found the fawn. The words or phrases that throw light upon this fact are-
“The touch made him delirious”
“ His heart thumped with the marvel of its acceptance of him.”
He was “ enchanted”
“He was light-headed with his joy”
“ It seemed to Penny that the boy’s eyes were as bright as the fawn’s.”
“ It was ecstasy to feel its tongue against his hand.”

9. How did the deer drink milk from the gourd?
A. The deer was unwilling to drink the milk directly from the gourd. So, Jody dipped his fingers in the milk and put them in its soft wet mouth instantly which the fawn sucked greedily. He was hungry, which is why when Jody took his fingers out of its mouth, it cried and hit him with his head. The next time Jody put his fingers in the fawn’s mouth. He gently lowered it so as to bring it near the utensil. The fawn became impatient, blew the milk as he sucked it and made sounds. The fawn was calm till Jody kept his fingers inside the milk and he drank with eyes closed in satisfaction. The milk disappeared quickly forming foam, which was marked by a bubbling sound.

10. Why didn’t the fawn follow Jody up the steps as he had thought it would?
A. The fawn hesitated and balked at the idea of climbing up the steps as he followed Jody. That is why Jody had to carry him up against his original idea.

Working with the Text

1. Why did Penny Baxter allow Jody to go find the fawn and raise it?
A. After Penny Baxter was bitten by a snake, he had accepted that he would not live to see another day. But, Jody helped extract poison out of him with the help  of a doe’s heart and liver. The doe had a fawn and Jody was worried about his survival. Penny Baxter allowed Jody to go find him and raise it because he thought it would be ungrateful of them to leave him alone to starve.

2. What did Doc Wilson mean when he said, “Nothing in the world ever comes quite free”?
A. When Jody was convincing ma Baxter to allow him to raise the fawn, whose mother (doe) was sacrificed to help save Penny Baxter, Doc Wilson remarked that “Nothing in the world ever comes quite free”. This meant that while they took the poor fawn’s mother’s life to save Jody’s father, they ought to take care of the fawn and raise him.

3. How did Jody look after the fawn, after he accepted the responsibility for doing this?
A. Jody took upon himself the responsibility of looking after the fawn. He carried it with utmost care and sensitivity to the house even though he was light-hearted with joy. He saved it from all the twigs and bushes that came along the way. He gave it his share of milk and even made it drink while remaining patient, as the fawn refused to drink directly from the gourd.

4. How does Jody’s mother react when she hears that he is going to bring the fawn home? Why does she react in this way?
A. Jody told his mother while she poured coffee for everyone that his father has given him permission to bring the fawn home. On hearing this, she paused and held the coffee pot in the air and asked which fawn is he talking about. Jody informs her that he intends on bringing the fawn that belonged to the doe they killed to save his father’s life. He further explained that they used doe’s liver to extract poison to save his father. She heaved a sigh as she said that he can bring him home out of pure compassion.
Further, on hearing the views of Mill-wheel and Doc Wilson, she sat down and agreed to let him bring the fawn home if Jody was ready to feed it with his share of milk because they had nothing else to feed it.

 

This is Jody’s Fawn- Grammar Exercises

  1. Here are some questions in direct speech. Put them into reported speech.

(i) Penny said, “Do you really want it son?”
(ii) Mill-wheel said, “Will he ride back with me?”
(iii) He said to Mill-wheel, “Do you think the fawn is still there?”
(iv) He asked Mill-wheel, “Will you help me find him?”
(v) He said, “Was it up here that Pa got bitten by the snake?”

Solution-
(i) Penny said, “Do you really want it son?”
Answer- Penny asked his son if he really wanted to raise the fawn.
(ii) Mill-wheel said, “Will he ride back with me?”
Answer- Mill-wheel asked if he would ride back with him.
(iii) He said to Mill-wheel, “Do you think the fawn is still there?”
Answer- Jody asked Mill-wheel if he thought the fawn would still be there.
(iv) He asked Mill-wheel, “Will you help me find him?”
Answer- Jody asked Mill-wheel if he would help Jody find him.
(v) He said, “Was it up here that Pa got bitten by the snake?”
Answer- Mill-wheel confirmed if it was up there that Pa got bitten by the snake.

2. Look at these two sentences.
He tumbled backward.
It turned its head.
The first sentence has an intransitive verb, a verb without an object. The second sentence has a transitive verb. It has a direct object. We can ask: “What did it turn?” You can answer: “Its head. It turned its head.”
Say whether the verb in each sentence below transitive or intransitive. Ask yourself a ‘what’ question about the verb, as in the example above. (For some verbs, the object is a person, so ask the question ‘who’ instead of ‘what’).
(i) Jody then went to the kitchen.
(ii) The fawn wobbled after him.
(iii) You found him.
(iv) He picked it up.
(v) He dipped his fingers in the milk.
(vi) It bleated frantically and butted him.
(vii) The fawn sucked his fingers.
(viii) He lowered his fingers slowly into the milk.
(ix) It stamped its small hoofs impatiently.
(x) He held his fingers below the level of the milk.
(xi) The fawn followed him.
(xii) He walked all day.
(xiii) He stroked its sides.
(xiv) The fawn lifted its nose.
(xv) Its legs hung limply

Solution-
(i) Jody then went to the kitchen. - Intransitive
(ii) The fawn wobbled after him. -intransitive
(iii) You found him. -transitive
(iv) He picked it up. -transitive
(v) He dipped his fingers in the milk. -transitive
(vi) It bleated frantically and butted him. - intransitive, transitive
(vii) The fawn sucked his fingers. - transitive
(viii) He lowered his fingers slowly into the milk. -transitive
(ix) It stamped its small hoofs impatiently. -transitive
(x) He held his fingers below the level of the milk. -transitive
(xi) The fawn followed him. -transitive
(xii) He walked all day. -intransitive
(xiii) He stroked its sides. -transitive
(xiv) The fawn lifted its nose. -transitive
(xv) Its legs hung limply- intransitive

3. Here are some words from the lesson. Working in groups, arrange them in the order in which they would appear in the dictionary. Write down some idioms and phrasal verbs connected to these words. Use the dictionary for more idioms and phrasal verbs.

close

draw

make

wonder

scrawny

parted

clearing

sweet

Light

pick

Solution-
These would appear in the following sequence in the dictionary

  1. Clearing
  2. Close
  3. Draw
  4. Light
  5. Make
  6. Parted
  7. Pick
  8. Scrawny
  9. Sweet
  10. Wonder

Idioms and phrasal verbs connected to these words

  1. Clearing-  clearing up
  2. Close- close shave, close quarters, close up
  3. Draw- draw in, draw upon
  4. Light- light on, light up
  5. Make- make up, make for
  6. Parted- parted ways
  7. Pick- pick up, pick on
  8. Scrawny- the scrawny neck
  9. Sweet- sweet scent, sweet tooth
  10. Wonder- wonder about, do wonders

 

 

Class 08th English Lessons Class 08th English MCQ Take Free MCQ Test English
Class 08th Science Lessons   Take Free MCQ Test Science
Class 08th Hindi Lessons   Take Free MCQ Test Hindi
CBSE CLASS 08th Social Science Lessons Take Free MCQ Test History