How I Taught My Grandmother to Read

 

CBSE Class 9 English Chapter 1 How I Taught My Grandmother to Read Summary, Explanation, Question Answers from Literature Reader (Communicative) Book

 
How I Taught My Grandmother to Read Class 9 – CBSE Class 9 English Literature Reader (Communicative) Book Lesson 1 How I Taught My Grandmother to Read Summary and Detailed explanation of the lesson along with the meanings of difficult words. Also, the explanation is followed by a Summary of the lesson. All the exercises and Questions and Answers given at the back of the lesson have been covered. 


 

 

Class-9, English  Literature Reader (Communicative) Chapter 1 – How I Taught My Grandmother to Read

by Sudha Murthy

 
 

How I Taught My Grandmother to Read Introduction

Grandmother

This story is about the writer being a Kannada teacher to her grandmother. 

 

 

 

 
 

Video Explanation of How I Taught My Grandmother to Read


 

 
 

How I Taught My Grandmother to Read Summary

 

When the writer was about twelve, she lived in a village in north Karnataka with her grandparents. Those days, morning papers came in the afternoon and the weekly magazine came one day late. They would wait eagerly for the bus to arrive because all the magazines and newspapers used to come in that vehicle only. There was a writer named Triveni, who was known for her psychological and easy-to-read novels. She used to write on the daily struggles of the people at that time, which enabled the people to connect with her stories. One of her novels, Kashi Yatre, was about an old lady who gave up the money for her trip to Kashi to an orphan girl, so that the girl could marry the man she loved. The writer’s grandmother too had a desire to go to Kashi but her desire was never fulfilled. So, she identified herself as the grandmother in that story. The writer’s grandmother was illiterate, and so she asked the writer, who was a school-going girl, to read out the latest episode to her. During that time, she would forget all her work and listen with the greatest concentration. Later, she could repeat the entire text by heart. The grandmother was always eager to learn what would happen next. She would also discuss the episode with her friends. The writer was not mature enough to understand why her grandmother took so much interest in Kashi Yatre. One day, she went for a wedding with her cousins to the neighbouring village. There, she enjoyed herself thoroughly by enjoying the freedom given by the elders. Although she was supposed to stay there for just a few days, she spent a whole week there. When she came home, she saw that her grandmother, who was otherwise a brave woman, was in tears. The writer, who became worried, asked if everything was fine and if she was okay. The grandmother nodded but did not speak. The writer did not understand and forgot about it. That night, when the writer was sleeping, her grandmother came and sat next to her. Her affectionate hands touched the writer’s forehead and the writer felt that she wanted to talk to her. She asked her what was wrong. The grandmother told her the sad incidents of her childhood, how she had lost her mother, her father was a busy man and had remarried, and at those times, education was not considered essential for girls. She got married at a very young age and had children. After that, she became busy keeping her children happy, because their happiness made her happy. She used to regret not going to school and so she made sure that her children and grandchildren studied well so that they would not feel any regret in the future. Even though the writer could not understand what her grandmother was talking about, she could see the sadness in her face. The worried-looking expression on her grandmother’s face made her sad. She leaned forward and held her hand. She asked her if she could help her in any way. The grandmother said “yes” and explained that while the writer was gone to the neighbouring village, she was desperately trying to read the next episodes of Kashi Yatre. She felt helpless and said that even though she was well-off she did not feel independent. She went on to request the writer to teach her the Kannada alphabet. The deadline for it would be Saraswati Pooja day during Dassara. The writer, who could see the determination on her grandmother’s face, childishly made fun of her desire to learn the Kannada alphabet at an old age. But the grandmother just smiled and said that for learning, there was no age bar. The next day onwards, the writer started her tuition.

 tuition

Avva, the grandmother, proved to be a wonderful student. Finally the Dassara festival came. Her grandmother called the writer to the pooja place and made her sit down on a stool. They were going to exchange gifts with each other. The grandmother gave her a frock and then touched the writer’s feet. The writer was taken aback because elders do not touch the feet of youngsters. Only the feet of God, elders and teachers were to be touched as it was a sign of respect. The writer felt like what the grandmother was doing was not correct. The grandmother explained that she was touching the feet of her teacher, not her granddaughter. The writer had taught her affectionately and had made her independent in such a short period of time. A teacher should be respected regardless of gender and age. The writer returned the namaskar and gave her the gift. It was the complete novel of Kashi Yatre. Her grandmother read the title and the publisher’s name immediately, and the writer knew that her student had passed with flying colours.

 

How I Taught My Grandmother to Read Lesson Explanation

 

When I was a girl of about twelve, I used to stay in a village in north Karnataka with my grandparents. Those days, the transport system was not very good, so we used to get the morning papers only in the afternoon. The weekly magazine used to come one day late. All of us would wait eagerly for the bus, which used to come with the papers, weekly magazines and the post.

weekly: something that occurs or arrives once a week

post: a piece of writing, image, or other item of content

When the writer was a twelve-year-old girl, she used to stay in a village situated in north Karnataka. She used to live with her grandparents. In those days, the transport system was not very good. This resulted in the residents of the village getting the morning papers only in the afternoon. The magazines, which came once a week, came one day late. The writer and her grandparents would wait eagerly for the bus, which used to carry the papers, weekly magazines, letters and all sorts of content. It would also carry letters. The weekly magazines were pieces which contained writing, images or any other type of content. 

 

At that time, Triveni was a very popular writer in the Kannada language. She was a wonderful writer. Her style was easy to read and very convincing. Her stories usually dealt with complex psychological problems in the lives of ordinary people and were always very

interesting. Unfortunately, for Kannada literature, she died very young. Even now, after forty years, people continue to appreciate her novels.

complex: complicated, difficult to understand

psychological: related to the emotional and mental state of the human mind

appreciate: praise

In those days there was a writer in the Kannada language who was very popular at that time. Her name was Triveni, and she was a wonderful writer. She wrote about the complicated problems in the lives of ordinary people. These problems affected the emotional and mental state of their minds and were always interesting to read about. Although Kannada literature was fortunate to have a talented writer like Triveni, they turned unfortunate when she died at a very young age. Even later, after forty years, people continued to praise her work or novels because it was impressive how she discussed relatable problems in such easy-to-read and convincing language.

Kashi Yatre

One of her novels, called Kashi Yatre, was appearing as a serial in the Kannada weekly Karmaveera then. It is the story of an old lady and her ardent desire to go to Kashi or Varanasi. Most Hindus believe that going to Kashi and worshipping Lord Vishweshwara is the ultimate punya. This old lady also believed in this, and her struggle to go there was described in that novel. In the story, there was also a young orphan girl who falls in love but there is no money for the wedding. In the end, the old lady gives away all her savings without going to Kashi. She says, ‘The happiness of this orphan girl is more important than worshipping Lord Vishweshwara at Kashi.’

karmaveera:  a Kannada weekly family interest magazine

ardent: very enthusiastic or passionate

punya: hindi word for ‘holy deed’

The writer now talks about a particular novel written by Triveni which has great importance in this story. There was a novel named Kashi Yatre which was appearing as a serial in the Kannada weekly Karmaveera, which was a Kannada weekly family interest magazine. Kashi Yatre was the story of an old lady who was very enthusiastic and passionate to visit Kashi or Varanasi. She, a religious woman, wanted to go there to worship Lord Vishweshwara. Like the majority of Hindus, she too believed that going to Kashi and worshipping Lord Vishweshwara is the ultimate punya or holy deed. However, she struggled to go to Kashi, which formed the plot of the story. In the story, there was also another important character. It was a young orphan girl who was in love and wanted to marry someone. However, she did not have the sufficient money to do so. The story ended with the old lady giving away all her savings to the girl without going to Kashi. Therefore, she sacrificed her own desire and possessions so that the girl could lead a happy life. The old lady said that the happiness of that orphan girl was more important than worshipping Lord Vishweshwara at Kashi. Therefore, the story taught the readers how the old lady gave up her possessions for the happiness of another human being.

 

My grandmother, Krishtakka, never went to school. So, she could not read. Every Wednesday, the magazine would come and I would read the next episode of the story to her. During that time, she would forget all her work and listen with the greatest concentration. Later, she could repeat the entire text by heart. My grandmother too never went to Kashi so she identified herself with the novel’s protagonist. More than anybody else, she was the one most interested in knowing what happened next in the story and used to insist that I read the serial out to her.

identify: associate someone or something closely with; regard as having strong links with

protagonist: the main character or hero of the story

insist: request repeatedly

The writer’s grandmother’s name was Krishtakka. She never went to school, which is why she could not read. Therefore, her grandmother was an illiterate person. She was interested in the magazines and the stories they contained, which is why she asked someone else to read out the magazine to her. Every Wednesday, the Karmaveera magazine used to come and it contained the next episode of Kashi Yatre. The grandmother was particularly interested in that story and asked the writer to read it out to her. Whenever she would be reading the next episode, her grandmother would forget all her work and would listen to the story with the greatest amount of concentration. Then, she would repeat the entire text with each and every detail and in the language used by Triveni. The grandmother associated herself with the novel’s main character, the old lady. This was because she too wanted to go to Kashi but her desire to do so was never fulfilled. She became so attached to the story that she was the one who was most interested to know what would happen in the next episode, and the writer had never seen anyone else being so eager for the next episode of Kashi Yatre. Since she was illiterate, she used to request the writer repeatedly to read out the next episode as she could not contain her curiosity.

 

After hearing what happened next in Kashi Yatre, she would join her friends at the temple courtyard, where we children would also gather to play hide and seek. She would discuss the latest episode with her friends.At that time, I never understood why there was so much of debate about the story.

courtyard: an unroofed area that is completely or partially enclosed by walls or buildings

gather: come together

After listening to the next episode, her grandmother and the writer would go to a temple. They would sit at the temple courtyard, which was a place which did not have a roof. There, the children would come together to play hide and seek and the grandmother would join her friends and discuss the latest episode with them. The writer, who was a young girl at that time, could not understand why the women would discuss the story so much with one another.

 

Once I went for a wedding with my cousins to the neighbouring village. In those days, a wedding was a great event. We children enjoyed ourselves thoroughly. We would eat and play endlessly, savouring the freedom because all the elders were busy. I went for a couple of days but ended up staying there for a week.

thoroughly: to a great extent

endlessly: in a manner that had no end

savouring: enjoying the taste or feel of something

One day, the writer went to the neighbouring village to attend a wedding. She went there with her cousins. Her grandparents or any other elderly person did not go with her. In those days, a wedding used to be a great event. The writer and the rest of the children enjoyed the event greatly. They ate and played so much that it seemed as if it was never going to end. The children were enjoying the feeling of freedom because either the elders were not with them or they were busy with the wedding ceremonies and other work. No one was there to stop or restrict them, and so they felt free. The writer had gone there for a couple of days but she was having so much fun that she ended up staying there for a week.

 

When I came back to my village, I saw my grandmother in tears. I was surprised, for I had never seen her cry even in the most difficult of situations. What had happened? I was worried.

‘Avva, is everything fine? Are you alright?’

When the week was finally over and the event had ended, the writer came back to her village. She returned home and saw that her grandmother was in tears, meaning that she had been crying. The writer was surprised. There had been many days where they faced the most difficult of situations. She had not seen her grandmother cry in even those moments. So, the writer was worried that something had worse happened and she was not aware about it. She called her grandmother ‘Avva’ and asked her if everything was fine and if she was alright.

 

I used to call her Avva, which means mother in the Kannada spoken in north Karnataka.

She nodded but did not reply. I did not understand and forgot about it. In the night, after dinner, we were sleeping in the open terrace of the house. It was a summer night and there was a full moon. Avva came and sat next to me. Her affectionate hands touched my forehead. I realised she wanted to speak. I asked her, ‘What is the matter?’

terrace: a flat and open area situated near the building or at the top of a building

The word ‘Avva’ is a word in Kannada language which means mother. The language is used in north Karnataka, where the writer and her grandparents lived. The writer used to refer to her grandmother using the word ‘Avva’, even though she was not her mother. It means that even though Krishtakka was the writer’s grandmother, the writer saw her more as a motherly figure. The grandmother nodded, meaning that she told the writer that she was fine. However, she did not reply or she did not say anything, indicating that she was lying when she said she was fine. The writer did not understand what it meant and she forgot about it. Then, the writer was sleeping in the open, flat area of the house, after having her dinner. It was a summer night and the full moon was out in the sky. Avva, her grandmother, came and sat next to the writer’s bed. Her hands, which were warm and full of affection, touched her forehead. The writer realised that her grandmother wanted to speak to her. She asked what was the matter.

writer

‘When I was a young girl I lost my mother. There was nobody to look after and guide me. My father was a busy man. He got married again. In those days, people never considered education essential for girls, so I never went to school. I got married very young and had children. I became very busy. Later I had grandchildren and always felt so much happiness in cooking and feeding all of you. At times I used to regret not going to school, so I made sure that my children and grandchildren studied well …’

regret: feel sad, repentant, or disappointed over something that one has done or failed to do

considered: paid attention to

The grandmother started telling the writer about her childhood. She told her that she had lost her mother when she was a young girl. Her father was a busy man and he remarried, which made him so busy that there was no one to look after and guide her. In those days, people never paid attention to the importance of education for girls. Therefore, she never went to school, and she just got married even though she was very young. Then she had children, which made her a busy woman. Then she had grandchildren. She loved her children and grandchildren, which was why she felt happy when she made them happy by cooking and feeding them. There were times when she felt sad that she had not gone to school, and so she made sure that her children and grandchildren studied well. She did not want to put them in her situation, and their happiness was ultimately her happiness.

 

I could not understand why my sixty-two-year-old grandmother was telling me, a twelve-year-old, the story of her life in the middle of the night. One thing I knew, I loved her immensely and there had to be some reason why she was talking to me. I looked at her face. It was unhappy and her eyes were filled with tears. She was a good-looking lady who was almost always smiling. Even today, I cannot forget the worried expression on her face. I leaned forward and held her hand.

immensely: in a huge or immense amount

The writer could not understand the reason why her sixty-two-year-old grandmother was telling the writer, a twelve-year-old, the story of her life in the middle of the night. However, she was sure of one thing and it was that she loved her grandmother very much and there had to be a reason why she was telling the story of her life to her. The writer then looked at her face, which was unhappy. Her eyes were filled with tears. The grandmother, who was a good-looking lady who had a happy, smiling face, had a worried expression on her face. The worried-looking expression had a strong impact on her as she remembered this expression even after many, many years. The writer did not want her grandmother to be sad and so she leaned forward and held her hand.

 

‘Avva, don’t cry. What is the matter? Can I help you in any way?’

‘Yes, I need your help. You know when you were away, Karmaveera came as usual. I opened the magazine. I saw the picture that accompanies the story of Kashi Yatre and I could not understand anything that was written. Many times, I rubbed my hands over the pages wishing to understand what was written. But I knew it was not possible. If only I was educated enough… I waited eagerly for you to return. I felt you would come early and read for me. I even thought of going to the village and asking you to read for me. I could have asked somebody in this village but I was too embarrassed to do so. I felt so very dependent and helpless. We are well-off, but what use is money when I cannot be independent?’

The writer asked her to not cry. She asked her what was the matter and if she could help her in any way. The grandmother said that she did need her help. When the writer was away, Karmaveera came as usual. She opened the magazine and saw the picture that comes with the story, but she could not understand anything that was written. She rubbed her hands over the pages, thinking that it would make her understand or give a clue as to what was written. However, since she was illiterate, she knew that she could not read the magazine. She again wished that she had received her education. She waited eagerly for the writer to return home. However, the writer had extended her visit to the neighbouring village, discouraging her grandmother. The grandmother then thought of going to the village and asking someone there to read it for her. But she felt too ashamed to ask for such a help. She felt very dependent and helpless. She added that she did not have a shortage of money, but money could not compensate for the lack of education. Money was of no use if she could not be independent.

 

I did not know what to answer. Avva continued.

‘I have decided I want to learn the Kannada alphabet from tomorrow onwards. I will work very hard. I will keep Saraswati Pooja day during Dassara as the deadline. That day I should be able to read a novel on my own. I want to be independent.’

The writer did not know what to say in response. Avva continued speaking. She told the writer that she had decided that she wanted to learn the Kannada alphabet from the next day to the Saraswati Pooja day during Dassara. She said that she would work very hard and on Dassara, she would be able to read a novel on her own without feeling helpless. She wanted to be independent.

 

I saw the determination on her face. Yet I laughed at her.

‘Avva, at this age of sixty-two you want to learn the alphabet? All your hair is grey, your hands are wrinkled, you wear spectacles and you have so much work in the kitchen…’

Childishly I made fun of the old lady. But she just smiled.

The writer could see how determined her grandmother was from her face. However, she laughed at her, saying that even though she was sixty-two-years-old, she wanted to learn the Kannada alphabet. She said that her hair had become grey, her hands were wrinkled, she wore spectacles and had so much work in the kitchen, and she still wanted to learn something new. The writer made fun of the old lady in a childish way, meaning that she was not insulting the old lady but she was just expressing her disbelief that someone of her age wanted to learn something new. The grandmother smiled in response to the writer’s disbelief.

 

‘For a good cause if you are determined, you can overcome any obstacle. I will work harder than anybody but I will do it. For learning, there is no age bar.’

The next day onwards, I started my tuition. Avva was a wonderful student. The amount of homework she did was amazing. She would read, repeat, write and recite. I was her only teacher and she was my first student. Little did I know then that one day I would become a teacher in Computer Science and teach hundreds of students.

The grandmother told her that she was determined to work hard for a good cause, and when someone is determined for a good cause, they can overcome any problem on the way. She said that she would work harder than everyone but she would make sure that she finally achieved her goal. She told the writer that when it comes to learning, there is no such thing as an age bar. The writer started the tuition from the next day. Avva was true to her word and was a wonderful student. She did an immense amount of homework which surprised the writer. She would work hard to learn the alphabets by heart by reading, repeating, writing, and reciting. The writer was the only person who was teaching her and her grandmother was her first student. Although there were many chances that the writer would not be a successful teacher, she became her only teacher. That twelve-year-old girl was not at all aware that she would grow up to become a teacher in Computer Science and teach hundreds of students.

 

The Dassara festival came as usual. Secretly, I bought Kashi Yatre which had been published as a novel by that time. My grandmother called me to the pooja place and made me sit down on a stool. She gifted me a frock. Then she did something unusual. She bent down and touched my feet. I was surprised and taken aback. Elders never touched the feet of youngsters. We have always touched the feet of God, elders and teachers. We considered that as a mark of respect. It is a great tradition but today the reverse had happened. It was not correct.

youngsters: young people

The festival came as usual and it was finally time for Avva’s knowledge to be put into test. The writer had secretly bought the novel Kashi Yatre as a gift for her grandmother. Her grandmother called her to the place where they performed their pooja and made her sit down on a stool. She then took out her gift, which was a frock, and gave it to her. Then, she did something unusual. She bent down and touched her granddaughter’s feet. The writer was both surprised and shocked at the same time. She was surprised because her grandmother had never touched her feet before, and she was shocked because what she did was not correct. Elders never touched the feet of young people. In fact, only the feet of God, elders and teachers were to be touched. Touching the feet of someone is seen as a mark of respect in the Hindu religion. It is a tradition which has been followed till date, but the reverse of the tradition occurred that day. The writer felt like it was not correct.

 

She said, “I am touching the feet of a teacher, not my granddaughter; a teacher who taught me so well, with so much of affection that I can read any novel confidently in such a short period. Now I am independent. It is my duty to respect a teacher. Is it not written in our scriptures that a teacher should be respected, irrespective of the gender and age?’

The grandmother must have noticed the shock on the writer’s face. She explained that she was not touching the feet of her granddaughter, but she was touching the feet of her teacher. She was giving respect to a teacher who performed her role excellently with affection and love. The writer taught her in a short period while having no prior experience of being a teacher. The writer helped her become independent, and it was her duty to respect such a teacher. It was written in their scriptures that a teacher should be respected regardless of who they are, and what their gender and age is. 

 

I did return namaskara to her by touching her feet and gave my gift to my first student. She opened it and read the title Kashi Yatre by Triveni and the publisher’s name immediately.

I knew, then, that my student had passed with flying colours.

namaskara: a traditional Indian greeting or gesture of respect

flying colours: achieve a great amount of success in something

The writer returned the namaskara by touching the grandmother’s feet and giving her the gift. Here namaskara means that she returned the gesture of respect. This indicates the elders are to be respected even if they are our students. Avva opened the gift and she read the title and the publisher’s name immediately. With this, the writer knew that her student had passed and achieved great success in learning the Kannada alphabet.

 

How I Taught My Grandmother to Read Question and Answers

 

  1. Now that you have enjoyed reading the story, answer the following questions

by choosing the correct option

 

(a) The grandmother could relate to the central character of the story ‘Kashi Yatre’ as

___________

(i) both were old and uneducated.

(ii) both had granddaughters who read to them.

(iii) both had a strong desire to visit Kashi.

(iv) both were determined to learn how to read.

Ans. (iii) both had a strong desire to visit Kashi.

 

(b) Why did the women at the temple discuss the latest episode of ‘Kashi Yatre’?

(i) to pass their time.

(ii) the writer, Triveni was very popular

(iii) they could relate with the protagonist of ‘Kashi Yatre’.

(iv) women have a habit of discussing stories.

Ans. (iii) they could relate with the protagonist of ‘Kashi Yatre’.

 

(c) The granddaughter found her grandmother in tears on her return as ______

(i) the grandmother had been unable to read the story ‘Kashi Yatre’ on her own.

(ii) the grandmother had felt lonely.

(iii) the grandmother wanted to accompany her granddaughter.

(iv) she was sad she could not visit Kashi.

Ans. (i) the grandmother had been unable to read the story ‘Kashi Yatre’ on her own.

 

(d) Why did the grandmother touch her granddaughter’s feet?

(i) She did it as a mark of respect for her teacher.

(ii) It was a custom in their family.

(iii) Girls should be respected.

(iv) She had read the story of ‘Kashi Yatre’ to her.

Ans. (i) She did it as a mark of respect for her teacher.

 

(e). “Childishly I made fun of the old lady. But she just smiled.” The smile of the grandmother

explains that she understood that her granddaughter

(i) was determined to teach her.

(ii) might be too immature to understand her pain.

(iii) would ridicule her later.

(iv) could be contemplating.

Ans. (ii) might be too immature to understand her pain.

 

(f). “Those days, the transport system was not very good, so we used to get the morning

papers only in the afternoon.” What can you infer from this?

(i) The transport system, especially the bus service, was running at loss.

(ii) The transport system, especially the bus service, was not fully functional in

rural areas.

(iii) The transport system, had stopped services in villages.

(iv) The transport system failed to introduce the bus service in rural areas.

Ans. (ii) The transport system, especially the bus service, was not fully functional in

rural areas.

 

  1. Answer the questions based on the extracts by selecting the correct options.

 

  1. Many times, I rubbed my hands over the pages wishing to understand what was written. But I knew it was not possible. If only I was educated enough …. I waited eagerly for you to return. I felt you would come early and read for me. I could have asked somebody in this village but I was too embarrassed to do so. I felt so very dependent and helpless. We are well-off, but what use is money when I cannot be independent?

 

  1. What made the grandmother feel inadequate?
  2. She was unable to read the story.
  3. She was unable to stay attentive.
  4. She was unable to buy the magazine.
  5. She was unable to understand the story.

Ans. a. She was unable to read the story.

 

  1. Select the relevant option that best supports the context of the given extract:
  2. Grandmother was elated to get the magazine
  3. Grandmother was embarrassed to ask for help
  4. Grandmother eagerly waited for her granddaughter’s arrival
  5. Grandmother loved gazing at the pictures from the story
  6. only 1 and 2 
  7. only 2 and 3 
  8. only 3 and 4 
  9. only 1 and 4

Ans. b. only 2 and 3 

 

iii. Select the option that tracks the progression of emotions experienced by the

grandmother in the given extract.

  1. reassured – inquisitive – thankful – uncertain
  2. surprised – grateful – perplexed – excited
  3. yearning – uncertain – dejected – helpless
  4. perplexed – uncertain – panic-stricken – appreciative

Ans. c. yearning – uncertain – dejected – helpless

 

  1. She said, “I am touching the feet of a teacher, not my granddaughter; a teacher who taught me so well, with so much of affection that I can read any novel confidently in such a short period. Now I am independent. It is my duty to respect a teacher. Is it not written in our scriptures that a teacher should be respected, irrespective of the gender and age”? I did return namaskara to her by touching her feet and gave my gift to my first student. She opened it and read the title Kashi Yatre by Triveni and the publisher’s name immediately. I knew, then, that my student had passed with flying colours.

 

  1. Choose the option that lists the most likely response to “…. I am touching the

feet of a teacher”.

  1. feel shy
  2. get anxious
  3. feel overwhelmed
  4. get upset

Ans. a. feel shy

 

  1. “A teacher should be respected irrespective of gender and age.” Select the quote that suggests a reason for this sentiment.
  2. Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education.
  3. A teacher aims to give equal attention to all the students.
  4. A teacher elevates the mind and gives energy to the character.
  5. Teaching is a profession that teaches all other professions.

Ans. d. Teaching is a profession that teaches all other professions.

 

iii. Select the sentence that best brings out the meaning of ‘confidently’ as used in the extract.

  1. Some of the information was confidently misleading.
  2. The report asserts confidently that the world economy will boost from the market collapse.
  3. The present memoir is confidently a tribute to his ability and character.
  4. The pandemic has confidently brought down the market.

Ans. b. The report asserts confidently that the world economy will boost from the market collapse.

 

  1. Which of the given option stands closest in meaning to “flying colours”?
  2. risky
  3. courageous
  4. profitable
  5. successful

Ans. d. successful

 

  1. Answer the following questions briefly :

(a) Why did the grandmother depend on her granddaughter to know the story?

 

Ans. The grandmother had not gone to school and had not received her education. Therefore, she was illiterate and did not know how to read the Kannada alphabets. The granddaughter on the other hand, was a school-going girl who knew how to read the Kannada alphabets very well. So, the grandmother would ask her granddaughter to read out the story to her and therefore, she was dependent on her.

 

(b) Pick out two sentences showing that the grandmother was desperate to know

what happened next in the story.

 

Ans. The two sentences showing that the grandmother was desperate to know

what happened next in the story are as follows – 

 

  1. Many times, I rubbed my hands over the pages wishing to understand what was written.
  2. I even thought of going to the village and asking you to read for me. I could have asked somebody in this village but I was too embarrassed to do so.

 

(c) Could the grandmother succeed in accomplishing her desire to read? How?

 

Ans. Yes, the grandmother succeeded in accomplishing her desire to read. She was a wonderful student, who worked hard to learn the Kannada alphabet. She would do an enormous amount of homework. She would read, repeat, write and recite, which was why she could learn the alphabets by heart. 

 

(d) Which of the following traits are relevant to the character of the narrator’s

grandmother?

(i) determined (ii) selfish

(iii) emotional (iv) mean

 

Ans. (i) determined

 

  1. Here are some direct quotations from the story. Identify the speaker and write what each quotation suggests about the speaker. You can use the adjectives given in the box and may also add your own.

 

amiable, tender, gentle, sympathetic, understanding, determined, diligent, kind, concerned, systematic, wise, helpful, enthusiastic, selfish, cruel, humble, religious, prudent, grateful, respectful

 

SpeakerQuotationQuality Highlighted
a.The writer/ the granddaughter‘Avva, is everything all right?

Are you O.K.?’

concerned
b.The grandmother‘At times, I used to regret not

going to school, so I made

sure that my children and

grandchildren studied well.’

prudent
c.The writer/ the granddaughter‘Avva, don’t cry. What is the

matter? Can I help you in

anyway?’

helpful
d.The grandmother‘We are well-off, but what use

is money when I cannot be

independent.’

wise
e.The grandmother‘I will keep Saraswati Pooja

day during Dassara as the

deadline.’

determined
f.The grandmother‘For a good cause if you are

determined you can

overcome any obstacle.’

diligent
g.The grandmotherI am touching the feet of a

teacher, not my granddaughter.’

religious