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Taro’s Reward CBSE Class 6 NCERT English Honeysuckle Book Lesson 3 Explanation, Summary, Difficult words

Taro’s Reward Class 6 English Honeysuckle Book Lesson 3 – Detailed explanation of the lesson along

with the meanings of difficult words. Also, the explanation is followed by a Summary of the lesson. All the exercises and Question and Answers given at the back of the lesson has been covered. 

 

 

Class 6 English (Honeysuckle Book) Chapter 3 – Taro’s Reward

a Japanese story retold

Taros Reward

By Jyoti Verma
 

 

Introduction

This story is based on morality which  talks about a caring and loving son who worked hard to take care of his parents and in return, receives unexpected help from nature. Its objective is to inculcate habits like love for parents and hardwork in the children.
 

 

 

Summary 

A young boy lived with his parents on a hillside. He was a woodcutter. He used to work very hard to take good care of his parents and to fulfill their wishes. One day, they were sitting in their cottage and his father felt very cold. He expressed a wish to get a cup of saké which would help him beat the chilly cold wave.

Taro got up earlier than his routine time and worked harder even after sunrise. Hard work made him thirsty and he started sweating. Suddenly, he heard a sound. This was the sound of the rushing water. He rushed to the direction of the sound. When he reached the waterfall, he bent to have water and was surprised on drinking it. The water was very tasty just like saké. 

He thought of giving this to his father as well. So he filled a pot and took it home.

His father felt very delighted and happy to have it. His shivering stopped with the very first sip. On the same day a lady from the neighbourhood visited him. He gave the saké to her also and shared the story of magic waterfall. She spread the story in the whole village. In the evening, all the villagers visited the old man to hear the story and to taste the saké. As a result, the pitcher was empty.

Next day,Taro got up even earlier to get the saké, carrying the largest bucket he had with him. But surprisingly, all the villagers were already there. One of the villagers bent to have it and he started having it again and again. After sometime, he told that it is not saké, rather water only. Everyone felt angry and wanted to drown Taro in that waterfall. But Taro was a wise boy. He hid himself and waited till everyone left the place. At last, when everyone was gone, he came out and checked the water. It was the same fine saké. He felt happy and noticed that waterfall was  giving water to the villagers and saké to him alone.

This story also reached the Emperor. He rewarded the boy to encourage other children to take care of their parents.
 

 

 

Lesson Explanation 

A YOUNG woodcutter named Taro lived with his mother and father on a lonely hillside. All day long he chopped wood in the forest. Though he worked very hard, he earned very little money. This made him sad, for he was a thoughtful son and wanted to give his old parents everything they needed.

chopped: cut into pieces

 thoughtful : caring 

 lonely:isolated, remote

There was a young boy named Taro. He was a woodcutter. He lived with his parents on a remote hillside.Throughout the day, he used to cut wood into pieces. Inspite, of his hard work, his income was very low. He felt upset because of his low income. As a caring son, his wish was to give everything to his parents that they needed.

One evening, when Taro and his parents were sitting in a corner of their hut, a strong wind began to blow. It whistled through the cracks of the hut and everyone felt very cold. Suddenly, Taro’s father said, “I wish I had a cup of saké; it would warm me and do my old heart good.”

whistled through: passed through with a whistling sound

cracks: narrow gaps/openings

saké : a popular Japanese drink (‘sa’ is pronounced like ‘fa’ in ‘father’ and ‘ke’ rhymes with ‘way’) 

A strong wind began to blow, when Taro was sitting with his parents in their hut. It passed through the small openings of the hut making a whistling sound. Everyone felt cold. Taro’s father expressed a wish to have saké to feel warm and to keep his heart healthy.

This made Taro sadder than ever, for the heart-warming drink called saké was very expensive. ‘How do I earn more money?’ he asked himself. ‘How do I get a little saké for my poor old father?’ He decided to work harder than before.

expensive: costly

The drink was very costly and his inability to buy the drink made him sadder. It bothered Taro all the more. He decided to work harder so that he can get a little saké for his father.

Next morning, Taro jumped out of bed earlier than usual and made his way to the forest. He chopped and cut, chopped and cut as the sun climbed, and soon he was so warm that he had to take off his jacket. His mouth was dry, and his face was wet with sweat. ‘My poor old father!’

He  thought.  ‘If only he was as warm as I!’ And with that he began to chop even faster, thinking of the extra money he must earn to buy the saké to warm the old man’s bones.

made his way to: went to

usual : routine

 take off : put off suddenly

 climbed : to come up

Next day, Taro got up earlier than his usual routine and went to the forest to work. There he kept cutting the wood even after sunrise. Suddenly, he felt so warm that he had to take off his jacket. His face was wet with sweat and mouth was dry. He thought of his father and wished if he could be as warm as he was. And with that thought, he began to chop at a faster speed. His intention was to earn more money so that he could arrange a saké to warm his father’s bones.

Then suddenly, Taro stopped chopping. What was that sound he heard? Could it be, could it possibly be rushing water? Taro could not remember ever seeing or hearing a rushing stream in that part of the forest. He was thirsty. The axe dropped out of his hands and he ran in the direction of the sound.

 Remember : have in or be able to bring to one’s mind an awareness of something    

 rushing:moving with urgent haste

 thirsty: feeling a need to drink

 dropped out: left 

 direction :the position towards which someone or something moves or faces

On hearing a sound,suddenly Taro stopped chopping and guessed the sound to be of  a moving stream.Taro never heard this kind of sound in that area of the forest. He was feeling an urge to drink water. He dropped the axe from his hands and ran towards the sound of the stream.

Taro saw a beautiful little waterfall hidden behind a rock. Kneeling at a place where the water flowed quietly, he cupped a little in his hands and put it to his lips. Was it water? Or was it saké? He tasted it again and again, and always it was the delicious saké instead of cold water.

 Waterfall: an area where water flows over a vertical drop

 Hidden: concealed, being out of sight

 Kneeling: to bent

 cupped a little in his hands: took some water in his hands (as if in a cup)

 delicious: very tasty

Taro saw a waterfall at the back of a rock. He bent a little to have water in his hands. The water was delicious to taste. So he drank it again and again to check whether it is water or saké. Everytime he drank water he felt as if it was not cold water, rather delicious saké.

Taro quickly filled the pitcher he had with him and hurried home. The old man was delighted with the saké. After only one swallow of the liquid he stopped shivering and did a little dance in the

middle of the floor.

pitcher: a pot usually made of mud

swallow: to gulp down

delighted: to feel happy

shivering: shaking slightly

Taro filled a pot with it and rushed home quickly. The old man felt very happy with the saké. He stopped shivering with a single gulp of the saké and even danced.

That afternoon, a neighbour stopped by for a visit. Taro’s father politely offered her a cup of the saké. The lady drank it greedily, and thanked the old man. Then Taro told her the story of the magic  waterfall. Thanking them for the delicious drink, she left in a hurry. By nightfall she had spread the story.

greedily: as if desiring more

 politely : softly

That very afternoon, a lady from the neighbourhood visited them. Taro’s father gave her a cup of the saké in a courteous manner. She drank it greedily. Taro’s father also shared the story of magic waterfall with her. Thanking them for the delicious drink, she left hurriedly and by night she had spread the story to the whole village.

That evening there was a long procession of visitors to the woodcutter’s house. Each man heard the story of the waterfall, and took a sip of the saké. In less than an hour the pitcher was empty.

procession :a march as a part of the ceremony a number of people or  moving forward in an orderly fashion

And by evening many people visited the woodcutter’s house. Each person heard the story of the waterfall and took a sip of the saké. Within an hour the pitcher (pot of water) was empty.

 

Next morning, Taro started for work even earlier than the morning before. He carried with him the largest pitcher he owned, for he intended first of all to go to the waterfall. When he reached it, he found to his great surprise all his neighbours there. They were carrying pitchers, jars, buckets — anything they could find to hold the magic saké. Then one villager knelt and held his mouth under the waterfall to drink. He drank again and again, and then shouted angrily, “Water! Nothing but water!” Others also tried, but there was no saké, only cold water.

intended: planned

Next day, Taro started for work even earlier and carried the largest pitcher he had. He wanted to reach the waterfall first of all. But he was surprised to see that all his neighbours were already there with their pots and jars to have the magic saké. But when one villager bent to have water from the waterfall, he drank it repeatedly and informed everyone angrily that it was just water and nothing else. Hearing this, other villagers also tasted it and they also found it to be only cold water and not Saké.

“We have been tricked!” shouted the villagers. “Where is Taro? Let us drown him in this waterfall.” But Taro had been wise enough to slip behind a rock when he saw how things were going. He was nowhere to be found. 

 tricked: deceived

 muttering: speaking unclearly

The villagers felt deceived and wanted to drown Taro in the waterfall. But Taro was a wise boy. He hid himself at the back of a rock. People couldn’t find him.

Muttering their anger and disappointment, the villagers left the place one by one. Taro came out from his hiding place. Was it true, he wondered? Was the saké a dream? Once more he caught a little liquid in his hand and put it to his lips. It was the same fine saké. To the thoughtful son, the magic waterfall gave the delicious saké. To everyone else, it gave only cold water.

Muttering: whisper, murmur

Disappointed, the villagers left the place one by one. When all were gone,Taro came out and wondered,  he checked the water and to his surprise, it was that same fine saké only. It meant that magic waterfall gave saké to Taro only and to other people, plain water.

The story of Taro and his magic waterfall reached the Emperor of Japan. He sent for the young woodcutter, and rewarded him with twenty pieces of gold for having been so good and kind. Then he named the most beautiful fountain in the city after Taro. This, said the Emperor, was to encourage all children to honour and obey their parents.

  sent for: called

  Encourage: to motivate

This story reached the emperor of Japan. He called the young woodcutter and rewarded him with 20 pieces of gold for being good and kind to his parents. Not only this, he also named the most beautiful fountain in the city after Taro’s name. It is said that the Emperor wanted to motivate all the children to obey their parents through Taro’s story.
 

 

 

Question and Answers

Answer these questions:

  1. Why did Taro run in the direction of the stream? 
  2. He ran in the direction of the stream because he was hearing the sound of the rushing water.
  3. How did Taro’s father show his happiness after drinking saké?
  4. His father showed his happiness by sharing the story of magic waterfall with the visitors. His body stopped shivering after the first sip of the fine saké.
  5. Why did the waterfall give Taro saké and others water?
  6. The waterfall did so to help and reward Taro for his unconditional kindness and support to his parents.
  7. Why did the villagers want to drown Taro?
  8. The villagers felt so because they were feeling as if Taro had deceived them.
  9. Why did the Emperor reward Taro? 
  10. The Emperor rewarded Taro to encourage him for his concern towards his parents and to motivate other children to follow his footsteps. 

 

Mark the right item.

  1. Taro earned very little money because

(i) he didn’t work hard enough.

(ii) the villagers didn’t need wood. 

(iii) the price of wood was very low.

  1. Taro decided to earn extra money

 (i) to live a more comfortable life.

 (ii) to buy his old father some saké.

 (iii) to repair the cracks in the hut.

  1. The neighbour left Taro’s hut in a hurry because

 (i) she was delighted with the drink

 (ii) she was astonished to hear Taro’s story.

 (iii) she wanted to tell the whole village about the waterfall

Answer:

1- (iii) the price of wood was very low.

2- (ii) to buy his old father some saké.

3- (iii) she wanted to tell the whole village about the waterfall

 

Grammar Exercises

 

Strike off the words below that are not suitable. 

Taro wanted to give his old parents everything they needed. This shows that he was …

Thoughtfulhardworkinglovinghonest
Consideratetrustworthyefficientkind

 

Thoughtful hardworking x loving x honest x

Considerate x trustworthy x efficient x kind x

  1. 1.This made Taro sadder than ever.”

 ‘This’ refers to

 (i) a strong wind that began to blow.

 (ii) Taro’s father’s old age.

 (iii) Taro’s inability to buy expensive saké for his father. 

(Mark the right item.)

Answer:(iii) Taro’s inability to buy expensive saké for his father. 

 

  1. “This, said the emperor, was to encourage all children to honour and obey their parents.” ‘This’ refers to

 (i) the most beautiful fountain in the city.

 (ii) rewarding Taro with gold and giving the fountain his name.

(iii) sending for Taro to hear his story. 

(Mark the right item.) 

  1. (ii) rewarding Taro with gold and giving the fountain his name.

 

  1. Arrange the words in the box below in pairs that rhyme.

Example: young – lung, money – sunny

 

Youngsadmoneychoplunglast
WaxCouldbadroundaxewood
WaystopsunnyFastroundday

 

A.

 

younglung
waxaxe
wayday
sadbad
couldwood
stopchop
moneysunny
soundround
fastlast

 

  1. 1. Fill in the blanks with words from the box.
lonelylittlehardyoung
thoughtfuldeliciousbeautiful

 

A ——————–— woodcutter lived on a ——————–— hillside. He was a ——————–——— son who worked ——————–——— but earned ——————–——— money. One day he saw a ——————–——— waterfall hidden behind a rock. He tasted the water and found it ——————–———. 

 

Answer: 

A young woodcutter lived on a lonely hillside. He was a thoughtful son who worked hard but earned little money. One day he saw a beautiful waterfall hidden behind a rock. He tasted the water and found it delicious

 

  1. Find these sentences in the story and fill in the blanks.

 (i) This made Taro ——————–——— than ever. 

 (ii) He decided to work ——————–——— than before. 

 (iii) Next morning, Taro jumped out of bed ——————–———than usual.

 (iv) He began to chop even ——————–——— . 

 (v) Next morning, Taro started for work even ——————–——— than the morning before.

Answer 

 (i) This made Taro sadder than ever. 

 (ii) He decided to work harder than before. 

 (iii) Next morning, Taro jumped out of bed earlier than usual.

 (iv) He began to chop even faster

 (v) Next morning, Taro started for work even earlier than the morning before.