A Different Kind of School Question Answers

 

CBSE Class 6 English Lesson 5 A Different Kind of School Question Answers (Important) from Honeysuckle Book

 

Class 6 English A Different Kind of School Question Answers – Looking for A Different Kind of School question answers for CBSE Class 6 English Honeysuckle Book Chapter 5? Look no further! Our comprehensive compilation of important questions will help you brush up on your subject knowledge. Practising Class 6 English question answers can significantly improve your performance in the exam. Improve your chances of scoring high marks by exploring Chapter 5: A Different Kind of School now. The questions listed below are based on the latest CBSE exam pattern, wherein we have given NCERT solutions to the chapter’s extract-based questions, multiple choice questions and Extra Question Answers 

 

Also, practising with different kinds of questions can help students learn new ways to solve problems that they may not have seen before. This can ultimately lead to a deeper understanding of the subject matter and better performance in exams. 

 

 
Related: A Different Kind of School Summary, Explanation, Word meanings 

 
 

A Different Kind of School NCERT Solution

A. Put these sentences from the story in the right order and write them out in a paragraph. Don’t refer to the text.

I shall be so glad when today is over. Having a leg tied up and hopping about on a crutch is almost fun, I guess.I don’t think I’ll mind being deaf for a day at least not much. l But being blind is so frightening. Only you must tell me about things. Let’s go for a walk.  The other bad days can’t be half as bad as this.

Ans. Let’s go for a little walk. Only you must tell me about things. I shall be very glad when today is over. The other bad days can’t be half as bad as this. Having a leg tied up and hopping about on a crutch is almost fun, I guess. I don’t think I’ll mind being deaf for a day – at least not much. But being blind is so frightening.

B. Answer the following questions

1. Why do you think the writer visited Miss Beam’s school?

Ans. The writer visited Miss Beam’s school because he had heard a lot of good things  about the school.It does unique games like they observe Blind day, Deaf day etc where the students act like blind,deaf, lame children and others act as helpers .These games ensure to sensitize the children towards the disabled.

2. What was the game that every child in the school had to play?

Ans. The ‘game’ that every child in the school had to play was that each term every child had one blind day, one lame day, one deaf day, one injured day and one dumb day.

3. Each term every child has one blind day, one lame day Complete the line. Which day was the hardest? Why was it the hardest?

Ans . Each term every child has one blind day, one lame day one deaf day, one injured day and one dumb day.The blind day is the hardest because one was always scared of being hurt.

4. What was the purpose of these special days?

Ans . The purpose of these special days was to enable children to appreciate the misfortune and sensitize towards the disabled.

A. Match the words and phrases with their meanings in the box below.

Paragraph numbers

1. homesick   (3)

2. Practically  (4)

3. it pains me   (7)

4. appreciate   (9)

5. thoughtless (10)

6. exercise   (11)

7. relief   (13)

8. ghastly   (14)

Almost
It hurts me
terrible
Test the strength of
Understanding the difficulties
Wanting to be home
A welcome change
Not very caring

Answer

1- wanting to be home

2- almost

3- it hurts me

4- understanding the difficulties

5- not very caring

6- test the strength of

7- a welcome change

8- terrible

 

Grammar Exercises

B. Re-word these lines from the story

1. I had heard a great deal about Miss Beam’s school. 2. Miss Beam was all that I had expected — middle-aged, full of authority. 3. I went to the window which overlooked a large garden. 4. “We cannot bandage the children’s mouths, so they really have to exercise their will-power.

Ans. I had heard a lot about Miss Beam’s school. So, I visited her school. Just as I visioned her, she was middle-aged, dominating personality. From her office. I peeped out of the window and observed a large garden. Children were playing there. They had their Blind day and were acting as Blind. Some others were helping them. Miss Beam told that they are doing this in the school to sensitize their children. But they can not bandage their mouths, here they exercise their will-power.

C. 1. Given below is a page from a dictionary. Look at it carefully and

(i) find a word which means the same as ghastly. Write down the word and its two meanings.
(ii) find a word meaning a part of the school year.
(iii) find a word that means examination.

Ans. (i) ghastly means terrible. Terrible means causing fear or very bad.
(ii) term means part of the school year
(iii) test means examination

2. Now make lists of (i) all the words on the page (plus any more that you can think of) that begin with terr- (ii) five words that may follow the last word on the page, that. (iii) write down your own meaning of the word thank. Then write down the meaning given in the dictionary.

A.

(i) all the words on the page (plus any more that can think of) that begin with terr-

  1. Terrain, terrace, terror, terracotta, territory

(ii) five words that may follow the last word on the page, that.

  1. theatre, thin, thumb, thump, this

(iii) write down your own meaning of the word thank. Then write down the meaning given in the dictionary.

  1. Thank means to show the feeling of gratefulness when someone gives you something or do some good to you.
  2. Meaning in dictionary: Thank means to show gratitude for any kind act or gift you receive.


 
 

Class 6 English A Different Kind of School Lesson 5 – Extract Based Questions

 

A.

I had heard a great deal about Miss Beam’s school, but not till last week did the chance come to visit it. When I arrived there was no one in sight but a girl of about twelve. Her eyes were covered with a bandage means she had a blind fold on her eyes and she was being led carefully between the flower-beds by a little boy, who was about four years younger. She stopped, and it looked like she asked him who had come. He seemed to be describing me to her. Then they passed on. Miss Beam was all that I had expected middle-aged, full of authority, yet kindly and understanding. Her hair was beginning to turn grey, and she had the kind of plump figure that is likely to be comforting to a homesick child. I asked her some questions about her teaching methods, which I had heard were simple. No more than is needed to help them to learn how to do things simple spelling, adding, subtracting, multiplying and writing. The rest is done by reading to them and by interesting talks, during which they have to sit still and keep their hands quiet. There are practically no other lessons. 

 

  1. What was the scene like when the writer arrived at Miss Beam’s school?

Ans: Upon arrival, the writer encountered a blindfolded girl being led by a younger boy through flower-beds.

 

  1. How would you describe Miss Beam’s appearance?

Ans: Miss Beam was in her middle-age. She was full of authority yet kind and understanding. She had grey hair and a comforting plump figure.

 

  1. What did the writer inquire about Miss Beam’s teaching methods?

Ans: The writer asked about the simplicity of Miss Beam’s teaching methods, particularly focusing on basic skills like spelling, math, and writing.

 

  1. How does Miss Beam primarily teach her students?

Ans: Miss Beam primarily teaches by reading to the students and engaging them in interesting discussions, requiring them to sit still and keep their hands quiet.

 

  1. What other types of lessons are noticeably absent in Miss Beam’s teaching approach?

Ans: There are practically no other lessons apart from reading, discussions, and basic skills like spelling, math, and writing.

B.

The real aim of this school is not so much to teach thought as to teach thoughtfulness kindness to others and being responsible citizens. Look out of the window a minute, will you? I went to the window which overlooked a large garden and a playground at the back. What do you see? Miss Beam asked.

I see some very beautiful grounds, I said, “and a lot of jolly children. It pains me, though, to see that they are not all so healthy and active-looking. When I came in, I saw one poor little girl being led about. She has some trouble with her eyes. Now I can see two more with the same difficulty. And there a girl with a crutch watching the others at play. She seems to be a hopeless cripple.”

Miss Beam laughed. Oh, no she said. She’s not really lame. This is only her lame day. The others are not blind either. It is only their blind day. I must have looked very surprised, for she laughed again.

 

  1. What is the primary aim of Miss Beam’s school?

Ans: Teaching thoughtfulness, kindness, and responsibility to the children.

 

  1. What does the writer observe when looking out of the window?

Ans: A large garden and playground with children, some of whom appear to have physical difficulties.

 

  1. How does Miss Beam explain the conditions of the children?

Ans: She explains that the children are not really blind or lame but are experiencing their designated “blind day” or “lame day.”

 

  1. What is Miss Beam’s reaction to the writer’s surprise?

Ans: She laughs and reassures the writer that the conditions observed are temporary and part of the school’s system.

 

  1. How does Miss Beam characterize the children’s experiences with simulated misfortunes?

Ans: She describes it as a lighthearted and educational process, lacking in misery and fostering kindness among the children.

 

C.

This is a very important part of our system. To make our children appreciate and understand misfortune, we make them share in misfortune too. Each term every child has one blind day, one lame day, one deaf day, one injured day and one dumb day. During the blind day their eyes are bandaged absolutely and they are on their honor not to peep. The bandage is put on overnight so they wake blind. This means that they need help with everything. Other children are given the duty of helping them and leading them about. They all learn so much this way both the blind and the helpers.

There is no misery about it, Miss Beam continued. Everyone is very kind, and it is really something of a game. Before the day is over, though, even the most thoughtless child realizes what misfortune is.

 

  1. What does each child experience during a term at Miss Beam’s school? 

Ans: Each child experiences one blind day, one lame day, one deaf day, one injured day, and one dumb day per term.

 

  1. What happens during the blind day? 

Ans: During the blind day, the child’s eyes are bandaged overnight so they wake blind requiring assistance with everything and they are on their honor not to peep.

 

  1. What duty do other children have during the blind day? 

Ans: Other children are assigned the duty of helping and leading the blindfolded child throughout the day.

 

  1. How does Miss Beam describe the atmosphere during these experiences? 

Ans: Miss Beam describes that there is no misery, everyone is kind, and it is somewhat like a game.

 

  1. What realization do the children typically have by the end of the day? 

Ans: By the end of the day, even the most thoughtless child realizes the nature of misfortune.

The blind day is, of course, really the worst, but some of the children tell me that the dumb day is the most difficult. We cannot bandage the children’s mouths, so they really have to exercise their will-power. Come into the garden and see for yourself how the children feel about it.

Miss Beam led me to one of the bandaged girls. Here a gentleman come to talk to you, said Miss Beam, and left us.

Don’t you ever peep? I asked the girl. Oh, no she exclaimed. That would be cheating! But I had no idea it was so awful to be blind. You can see a thing. You feel you are going to be hit by something every moment. It was such a relief just to sit down.

 

  1. What is considered the most difficult day for some of the children? 

Ans: The dumb day is considered the most difficult by some children.

 

  1. How does Miss Beam address the challenge of the dumb day? 

Ans: Miss Beam explains that they cannot bandage the children’s mouths, so the children have to exercise their will-power.

 

  1. What does Miss Beam invite the writer to do to understand the children’s feelings? 

Ans: Miss Beam invites the writer to come into the garden and see for themselves how the children feel about their experiences.

 

  1. How does one of the bandaged girls respond when asked if she ever peeps? 

Ans: She responds by saying she never peeps because it would be cheating.

 

  1. What does the girl express about her experience of being blind? 

Ans: She expresses that being blind is awful because you can’t see anything, and you feel like you’re going to be hit by something every moment.

Are your helpers kind to you? I asked. Fairly. But they are not as careful as I shall be when it is my turn. Those that have been blind already are the best helpers. It’s perfectly ghastly not to see. I wish you try. Shall I lead you anywhere? I asked.

Oh, yes,” she said. Let’s go for a little walk. Only you must tell me about things. I shall be so glad when today is over. The other bad days can’t be half as bad as this. Having a leg tied up and hopping about on a crutch is almost fun, I guess. Having an arm tied up is a bit more troublesome because you can’t eat without help, and things like that. I don’t think I’ll mind being deaf for a day” at least not much. But being blind is so frightening. My headaches all the time just from worrying that get hurt. Where are we now?

 

  1. How does the girl describe her helpers? 

Ans: The girl describes her helpers fairly kind, but not as careful as she will be when it’s her turn to help.

 

  1. Who does the girl say are the best helpers? 

Ans: According to girl those who have already experienced being blind are the best helper.

 

  1. What does the girl express about being blind? 

Ans: The girl finds it frightening, and mentions having constant headaches from worrying about getting hurt.

 

  1. What does the girl think about having her leg tied up and hopping on a crutch? 

Ans: She finds it almost fun.

 

  1. What does the girl anticipate about being deaf for a day? 

Ans: The girl doesn’t think she’ll mind being deaf for a day, at least not as much as being blind, as being blind is frightening.

 

In the playground, I said. We’re walking towards the house. Miss Beam is walking up and down the garden with a tall girl. What is the girl wearing? my little friend asked. A blue cotton skirt and a pink blouse. I think it’s Millie? she said. What color is her hair? Very light, I said. Yes, that’s Millie. She’s the Head Girl. There’s an old man tying up roses, I said. Yes, that’s Peter. He’s the gardener. He’s hundreds of years old! And here comes a girl with curly red hair. She’s on crutches. That’s Anita, she said. And so we walked on. Gradually I discovered that I was ten times more thoughtful than I ever thought I could be. I also realized that if I had to describe people and things to someone else, it made them more interesting to me. When I finally had to leave, I told Miss Beam that I was very sorry to go. Ah! she replied, then there is something in my system after all.

 

  1. Who is described as walking up and down the garden with Miss Beam?

Ans: A tall girl, identified as Millie, the Head Girl.

 

  1. What is Millie wearing?

Ans: Millie is wearing a blue cotton skirt and a pink blouse.

 

  1. Who is the old man tying up roses?

Ans: The old man is Peter, the gardener.

 

  1. How is Anita described?

Ans: Anita is described as a girl with curly red hair who is on crutches.

 

  1. What realization does the writer have during the walk?

Ans: The writer realizes that he was ten times more thoughtful than he ever thought. He also realizes that describing people and things to someone else makes them more interesting.
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Class 6 English Honeysuckle Book Lesson 5 A Different Kind of School Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs)

 

Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs) are a type of objective assessment in which a person is asked to choose one or more correct answers from a list of available options. An MCQ presents a question along with several possible answers.

  1. What is the main focus of Miss Beam’s school?

a) Teaching advanced subjects like mathematics and science

b) Promoting thoughtfulness, kindness, and responsibility

c) Providing intensive physical education

d) Training students for competitive exams

Ans: b) Promoting thoughtfulness, kindness, and responsibility

 

  1. What age is the girl being led around the flower-beds?

a) Ten

b) Twelve

c) Fourteen

d) Six

Ans. b) Twelve

 

  1. What age group does the little boy helping the blindfolded girl belong to?

a) About twelve

b) About eight

c) About six

d) About ten

Ans. c) About six

 

  1. What are the simple subjects taught at Miss Beam’s school?

a) Mathematics and science

b) History and geography

c) Spelling, adding, subtracting, multiplying, and writing

d) Literature and arts

Ans. c) Spelling, adding, subtracting, multiplying, and writing

 

  1. What is the purpose of the blind days, lame days, etc., in Miss Beam’s school?

a) To punish the students

b) To make children appreciate and understand misfortune

c) To give the teachers a break from regular lessons

d) To provide entertainment for the students

Ans. b) To make children appreciate and understand misfortune

 

  1. How do the children at Miss Beam’s school experience a “blind day”?

a) They wear a blindfold during specific activities.

b) Their eyes are bandaged overnight, and they wake up blind.

c) They are instructed to keep their eyes closed for the entire day.

d) They are given glasses that block their vision.

Ans. b) Their eyes are bandaged overnight, and they wake up blind.

 

  1. How do the students feel about the blind day?

a) They find it exciting and enjoyable.

b) They consider it a punishment.

c) They experience fear and discomfort.

d) They are indifferent to it.

Ans. c) They experience fear and discomfort.

 

  1. What is the girl’s reaction when asked if she ever peeps during the blind day?

a) She admits to peeping occasionally.

b) She avoids answering the question.

c) She confesses to peeping but justifies it.

d) She denies ever peeping, stating it would be cheating. 

Ans. d) She denies ever peeping, stating it would be cheating.

 

  1. Who is described as the Head Girl at Miss Beam’s school?

a) Anita

b) Millie

c) The blindfolded girl

d) Miss Beam

Ans. b) Millie

 

  1. Who is Peter?

a) Gardener 

b) Teacher 

c) Janitor

d) Headmaster

Ans. a) Gardener

 

  1. What realization does the narrator come to after spending time at Miss Beam’s school?

a) The importance of advanced education

b) The significance of physical activities

c) The value of thoughtfulness and observation

d) The need for stricter discipline

Ans. c) The value of thoughtfulness and observation

 

  1. What is Miss Beam’s demeanor described as?

a) Stern and unapproachable

b) Middle-aged, authoritative, yet kind and understanding

c) Youthful and energetic

d) Strict and disciplinary

Ans. b) Middle-aged, authoritative, yet kind and understanding

 

  1. What realization do the children have during the blind day?

a) The joy of experiencing a new challenge

b) The severity of being blind and the need for assistance

c) The importance of cheating to overcome difficulties

d) The ease of pretending to be blind

Ans. b) The severity of being blind and the need for assistance

 

  1. Why does the girl refuse to peep during the blind day?

a) She believes it would be cheating.

b) She enjoys the challenge of navigating without vision.

c) She fears punishment from Miss Beam.

d) She thinks it’s unnecessary.

Ans. a) She believes it would be cheating.

 

  1. Who leads the blindfolded children around during their blind day?

a) Teachers

b) Other students

c) Parents

d) Volunteers

Ans. b) Other students

 

  1. How often does each child at Miss Beam’s school experience a blind day?

a) Every week

b) Every term

c) Every month

d) Every year

Ans. b) Every term

 

  1. What realization does the narrator have about himself after visiting Miss Beam’s school?

a) He is ten times smarter than he ever thought.

b) He is ten times more thoughtful than he ever thought

c) He is ten times happier than he ever thought.

d) He is ten times more active than he ever thought.

Answer: b) He is ten times more thoughtful than he ever thought.

 

  1. What color is Anita’s hair?

a) Brown

b) Black

c) Red

d) Blonde

Ans. c) Red

 

  1. What does the visitor learn about describing people and things to others?

a) It makes them less interesting.

b) It has no impact on their perception.

c) It makes them more interesting.

d) It confuses them.

Ans. c) It makes them more interesting.

 

  1. What is the purpose of Miss Beam’s teaching methods?

a) To encourage competition among students

b) To instill discipline through strict rules

c) To promote kindness, thoughtfulness, and responsibility among children

d) To prioritize academic excellence above all else

Ans. c) To promote kindness, thoughtfulness, and responsibility among children

 

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Class 6 A Different Kind of School Extra Question Answers

 

  1. Why did Miss Beam ask the writer to look out of the window?

Ans: Miss Beam asked the writer to look over the window because she wanted him to see her teaching techniques and why her school was dissimilar from the rest of the schools.

 

  1. How was Miss Beam’s school different from other schools?

Ans: The real purpose of Miss Beam’s school was to make the children thoughtful. They were taught to be kind to others and become responsible citizens. The school was particularly aimed at inculcating ‘thoughtfulness’.

 

  1. How did the game of becoming blind, lame, deaf or dumb help the children?

Ans: The ‘game’ of becoming blind, lame, deaf or dumb for a day helped the children to understand the pain of misfortune and the need to help the sufferer.

 

  1. What did the writer see when he looked out from the window?

Ans: When the writer looked out the window, he observed a beautiful garden and that some children were bandaged-eyed, a few were lame, some could not hear and some were there to help them. He was sad to notice some children who were not very healthy and active.

 

  1. What did Miss Beam tell the writer about the children in the playground?

Ans: Miss Beam informed the author that no child was lame, blind, or crippled. They were being made to appreciate and understand misfortune. Each term, every child had one blind day, one lame day, and one dumb day. Other kids helped them.

 

  1. How has the girl with bandaged eyes impressed the author?

Ans: The author was impressed when she told him about the head girl just by asking the details of her clothes, hair, height etc. He was taken aback when she told him about the activities of the gardener without seeing.

 

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