The Solitary Reaper Important Question Answers

 

CBSE  Class 9 English Literature Reader (Communicative) Chapter 8 The Solitary Reaper Important Question Answers

 

The Solitary Reaper Question Answers  – Looking for The Solitary Reaper question answers for Class 9 English Literature Reader (Communicative) book Chapter 8? Look no further! Our comprehensive compilation of important questions will help you brush up on your subject knowledge. Practising Class 9 English Communicative question answers can significantly improve your performance in the exam. Our solutions provide a clear idea of how to write the answers effectively. Improve your chances of scoring high marks by exploring Chapter 8: The Solitary Reaper now. The questions listed below are based on the latest CBSE exam pattern, wherein we have given solutions to the chapter’s extract based questions, short answer questions, and long answer questions. 

Also, practising with different kinds of questions can help students learn new ways to solve problems that they may not have seen before. This can ultimately lead to a deeper understanding of the subject matter and better performance on exams.  

 

 

 
 

Class 9 Communicative English The Solitary Reaper Question Answers Chapter 8 – Extract Based Question

I. “Behold her, single in the field,
Yon solitary Highland Lass!
Reaping and singing by herself;
Stop here, or gently pass!
Alone she cuts and binds the grain,
And sings a melancholy strain;
O listen! for the Vale profound
Is overflowing with the sound.”

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1. The speaker describes the Highland girl as:
a) Joyful and carefree.
b) Solitary and melancholic.
c) Energetic and enthusiastic.
d) Content and peaceful.
Answer: b) Solitary and melancholic.

2. The speaker asks the listener to-
a) Join the girl in singing.
b) Hurry past without disturbing her.
c) Stop and listen to her song.
d) Offer the girl some help.
Answer: c) Stop and listen to her song.

3. The phrase “Vale profound” refers to:
a) The sky above the field.
b) The girl’s deep emotions.
c) The valley where the girl works.
d) The girl’s mournful singing voice.
Answer: c) The valley where the girl works.

4. The speaker uses the word “overflowing” to describe:
a) The amount of grain the girl has harvested.
b) The beauty of the surrounding landscape.
c) The abundance of wildlife in the valley.
d) The volume of the girl’s song.
Answer: d) The volume of the girl’s song.

5. What does “melancholy strain” mean?
a) Beautiful song
b) Folk song
c) Love song
d) Sad song
Answer: d) Sad song

II. “No Nightingale did ever chaunt
More welcome notes to weary bands
Of travellers in some shady haunt,
Among Arabian sands:
A voice so thrilling ne’er was heard
In spring-time from the Cuckoo-bird,
Breaking the silence of the seas
Among the farthest Hebrides.”

1. According to the speaker, the Highland girl’s song is:
a) Comparable to a nightingale’s song.
b) More beautiful than any bird’s song.
c) A lullaby for weary travelers.
d) A lament for lost loved ones.
Answer: b) More beautiful than any bird’s song.

2. The speaker mentions travelers in “some shady haunt” to emphasize:
a) The harshness of the desert environment.
b) The need for companionship on journeys.
c) The rarity of beautiful singing voices.
d) The contrast between the girl’s song and the desolate landscape.
Answer: c) The rarity of beautiful singing voices.

3. The speaker compares the girl’s voice to the song of the cuckoo-bird in order to convey:
a) A sense of joyful anticipation.
b) A sense of melancholy beauty.
c) A sense of peace and serenity.
d) A sense of mysterious remoteness.
Answer: b) A sense of melancholy beauty.

4. The speaker mentions “the farthest Hebrides” to emphasize:
a) The vastness of the ocean.
b) The girl’s isolation and loneliness.
c) The power of music to travel far and wide.
d) The cultural diversity of Scotland.
Answer: b) The girl’s isolation and loneliness.

5. Which of the following statements is true with reference to the above lines.

i. “In some shady haunt, / Among Arabian sands…” – This vivid image evokes a sense of aridity and isolation, further emphasizing the impact of the girl’s song in such a harsh environment.

ii. “Breaking the silence of the seas / Among the farthest Hebrides…” – This image creates a sense of vastness and loneliness, highlighting the power of the girl’s voice to break through the stillness of the remote Hebrides.

a) Both i and ii
b) Only i
c) Only ii
d) Neither of the two
Answer: a) Both i and ii

III. “Will no one tell me what she sings?—
Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow
For old, unhappy, far-off things,
And battles long ago:
Or is it some more humble lay,
Familiar matter of to-day?
Some natural sorrow, loss, or pain,
That has been, and may be again?”

1. The speaker’s main question in this stanza is:
a) Why is the girl singing?
b) What language is the girl singing in?
c) How beautiful is the girl’s voice?
d) Where did the girl learn to sing?
Answer: a) Why is the girl singing?

2. The speaker suggests that the girl’s song might be about:
a) The joy of working in nature.
b) The beauty of the Highland landscape.
c) The hardships of everyday life.
d) Events from the distant past.
Answer: d) Events from the distant past.

3. The phrase “the plaintive numbers flow” suggests that the girl’s song is:
a) Upbeat and cheerful.
b) Slow and mournful.
c) Loud and passionate.
d) Fast and lively.
Answer: b) Slow and mournful.

4. What do you understand by”humble lay”
a) Ordinary song
b) Classical song
c) Jazz song
d) Disco song
Answer: a) Ordinary song

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5. The speaker suggests that the girl’s song might also be about:
a) A specific historical event.
b) A personal loss or pain.
c) The beauty of the natural world.
d) The future of the Highland people.
Answer: b) A personal loss or pain.

IV. “Whate’er the theme, the Maiden sang
As if her song could have no ending;
I saw her singing at her work,
And o’er the sickle bending;—
I listened, motionless and still;
And, as I mounted up the hill,
The music in my heart I bore,
Long after it was heard no more.”

1. The metaphor “The music in my heart I bore” suggests that:
a) The speaker memorized the song’s melody.
b) The speaker understood the song’s meaning.
c) The song had a deep emotional impact on the speaker.
d) The speaker became a better singer himself.
Answer: c) The song had a deep emotional impact on the speaker.

2. The phrase “as if her song could have no ending” suggests that the speaker:
a) Is annoyed by the length of the song.
b) Is impressed by the girl’s stamina.
c) Feels a sense of timelessness and endlessness.
d) Wishes he could hear the song again.
Answer: c) Feels a sense of timelessness and endlessness.

3. The speaker describes the girl as “bending” over her sickle to emphasize:
a) Her dedication to her work.
b) Her graceful movements.
c) Her physical exhaustion.
d) Her emotional exhaustion.
Answer: a) Her dedication to her work.

4. The speaker says he listened to the song “motionless and still” to:
a) Show respect for the girl’s talent.
b) Avoid disturbing the girl’s concentration.
c) Focus all his attention on the song.
d) Show his own fatigue from the journey.
Answer: c) Focus all his attention on the song.

5. The speaker’s final statement, “Long after it was heard no more,” implies that:
a) He forgot the song quickly.
b) He missed the girl’s singing dearly.
c) He was grateful for the temporary experience.
d) He was disappointed by the song’s ending.
Answer: b) He missed the girl’s singing dearly.
 

 
 

Class 9 Communicative English The Solitary Reaper Short Question Answers

Q1. Discuss the girl’s song in the poem “The Solitary Reaper”.
Ans. The girl’s melancholy song fills the valley, captivating the poet. He compares her voice to the song of a nightingale and the cuckoo-bird, highlighting its sweetness and emotional depth. This emphasizes the power of music to evoke emotions and transcend language and understanding.

Q2. Describe the setting of the poem.
Ans. The poem “The Solitary Reaper” opens with a solitary Highland girl working in a vast valley. The poet is initially captivated by her grace and beauty as she harvests the grain.

Q3. How does the speaker describe the girl’s song? What emotions does it evoke in him?
Ans. The speaker describes the girl’s song as melancholic and hauntingly beautiful, surpassing anything he has ever heard. It evokes a range of emotions in him, including longing, joy, and wonder.

Q4. Who is the solitary reaper? Where does the poet encounter the solitary reaper?
Ans. The Highland girl is the solitary reaper. The poet encounters the solitary reaper in a field, nestled within a serene valley. This setting is further described as sunlit and golden, suggesting a sense of rural beauty and peace.

Q5. Briefly describe the imagery used to depict the girl and her surroundings.
Ans. The girl is depicted as single and graceful as she reaps the grain. The poet compares her movements to a dancer, highlighting her rhythmic and elegant work. The imagery also emphasizes her solitude in the vast landscape.

Q6. What is the poet’s initial impression of the reaper?
Ans. The speaker is immediately captivated by the reaper. He uses words like “single in the field,” “Yon solitary Highland Lass,” and “alone she cuts and binds the grain” to emphasize her isolation and independence. Despite the solitude, the speaker is clearly struck by her beauty and grace. He feels a sense of awe and wonder at her presence in the peaceful scenery.

Q7. ‘Will no one tell me what she sings?’ Why does the poet ask this question? What, according to the speaker, might be the theme of the girl’s song?
Ans. The English poet is not familiar with the language of the Scottish Highlanders. So he cannot follow the meaning of the Highland girl’s song. That is why he asks this question.
The poet tries to guess what could be the theme of the song. He imagines that the song perhaps tells the tale of some unhappy events of the past or of some battle that had been fought in the distant past. He also thinks that the song may be about some loss or pain.

Q8. What is the main characteristic of the girl’s song?
Ans. The main characteristic of the girl’s song is its melancholy beauty. The song evokes a sense of sadness, longing, and bittersweet joy. This is evident in phrases like “melancholy strain,” “plaintive numbers,” and the poet’s comparison of the song to “old, unhappy, far-off things.”

Q9. How does the speaker compare the girl’s voice to other natural sounds?
Ans. The poet compares the girl’s voice to various natural sounds:

  • Nightingale: The speaker says “No Nightingale did ever chaunt / More welcome notes…” This comparison emphasizes the sweetness and melodious nature of the girl’s voice.
  • Cuckoo-bird: The line “A voice so thrilling ne’er was heard / In spring-time from the Cuckoo-bird…” highlights the beauty and emotional depth of the girl’s song, suggesting it surpasses the joyful song of the cuckoo.

Q10. Explain the significance of the phrase “plaintive numbers.”
Ans. The phrase “plaintive numbers” refers to the sad and flowing quality of the girl’s song. It suggests a song with a simple, yet emotional tone that carries the weight of unspoken feelings. The word “numbers” emphasizes the rhythm and structure of the song, suggesting it is not simply a random cry of emotion, but a carefully crafted expression of longing and sadness. It is not just a melancholy song, but a deep emotion that draws the listener in and compels them to share in the singer’s experience.

Q11. What imagery or metaphor is used to convey the song’s lasting impact?
Ans. The poem uses the metaphor of music carried in the heart to convey the song’s lasting impact. This imagery suggests that the song’s emotional resonance transcends the physical act of hearing and becomes a part of the speaker’s inner world. He carries the melody and emotions within him, allowing them to continue to influence him long after the encounter.

Q12. What was the nature of the girl’s song?
Ans. The tune of the Highland girl’s song was thrilling and melancholy at the same time. It reminded the poet of a Nightingale’s song. He compared its sweet notes with the Cuckoo’s call. And yet, at the same time, he thought that the song told the tale of some unhappy events of the past or of some battles fought long ago.

Q13. How does Wordsworth lay an extra emphasis on the loneliness of the Highland girl?
Ans. The Highland girl is all alone in the field. She is reaping and singing by herself and as the poem is about the lonely reaper girl and her song, the poet has called the poem ‘The Solitary Reaper’.

Q14. Mention some of the things which the poet sees and the things which he imagines in the poem.
Ans. The poet sees a deep valley in which a Highland girl is reaping and singing all by herself. She bends over the sickle as she cuts and binds the grain.

The poet imagines that neither the Nightingale nor the Cuckoo bird in the Hebrides had ever sung so sweetly. He thinks that the girl’s song might be about some unhappy, far off things, or about battles fought in the distant past. He also imagined that the girl’s song might be about some loss or pain which is an inseparable part of man’s life.

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Q15. “The music in my heart I bore,
Long after it was heard no more.” What light do these lines throw on the poet’s personality?
Ans. The speaker is profoundly affected by the reaper’s song. He carries the music “in his heart” long after it fades, suggesting a strong emotional response and an appreciation for beauty that goes beyond the immediate experience. The speaker doesn’t simply enjoy the song; he carries the music within him.
 

 
 

Class 9 Communicative English The Solitary Reaper Long Answer Questions Chapter 8

Q1. What is the poet’s lament in the poem?
Ans. Following are the poet’s lament in the poem ‘The Solitary Reaper’ is that

  • The solitary nature of the reaper: The image of the girl working alone in the vast landscape evokes a sense of isolation and loneliness.
  • The mystery of the song: The speaker’s inability to understand the meaning of the girl’s song creates a feeling of incompleteness and a desire to grasp its deeper significance.
  • The temporary nature of the experience: The speaker’s final statement about carrying the music in his heart “long after it was heard no more” suggests a sense of loss and the fading of a beautiful moment.

 

Q2. Describe the speaker’s emotional response to the song.
Ans. The speaker’s emotional response to the song is multifaceted and deeply felt:

  • Captivation: He is initially drawn in by the beauty and sweetness of the song, comparing it to the nightingale and cuckoo.
  • Awe and Wonder: The speaker’s stillness and attentiveness as he listens (“I listened, motionless and still”) suggest a sense of reverence and wonderment at the power of the song.
  • Melancholy and Longing: The song’s melancholic nature evokes a matching emotion in the speaker. He feels a sense of sadness and longing, possibly for the unknown past or the fleeting beauty of the moment.
  • Deep emotional impact: The final line, “The music in my heart I bore, / Long after it was heard no more,” reveals the song’s lasting impact. It leaves a profound mark on the speaker’s soul, continuing to resonate even after the physical sound has faded.

 

Q3. Discuss the central theme of the poem.
Ans. The central theme of the poem “The Solitary Reaper” is the profound power of beauty and music to touch the soul. The solitary reaper’s song, despite its unknown meaning, evokes a range of emotions in the speaker, demonstrating the ability of art to connect us to our own humanity and the beauty of the world around us.
The ending reinforces this theme by emphasizing the lasting impact of the song. Even though the experience is temporary, the speaker carries the music within him, forever changed by its beauty and emotional power. This underscores the idea that art can leave a permanent mark on our lives, enriching our inner world and reminding us of the profound connections we can experience through beauty and music.


Q4. Discuss the literary devices in the poem “The Solitary Reaper”.

Ans. Some of the literary devices in the poem are-

1. Simile:
Example: “No Nightingale did ever chaunt / More welcome notes to weary bands…”
Explanation: This simile compares the girl’s song to the nightingale’s melody, highlighting its sweetness and ability to bring comfort. It adds a familiar reference point to the unfamiliar song, enhancing its appreciation.

2. Personification:
Example: “The Vale profound / Is overflowing with the sound…”
Explanation: This personification assigns the valley the ability to feel emotions, suggesting it is deeply moved by the girl’s song. It adds a sense of wonder and magic to the scene, emphasizing the song’s powerful impact on the environment.

3. Repetition:
Example: “I listened, motionless and still; / And, as I mounted up the hill…”
Explanation: The repetition of “still” emphasizes the speaker’s complete absorption in the song. It creates a sense of timelessness and underscores the profound impact the experience has on him.

Q5. How does “The Solitary Reaper” reflect the Romantic ideals of beauty, nature, and emotion?
Ans. “The Solitary Reaper” beautifully reflects several key Romantic ideals:

1. Beauty in Simplicity: The poem celebrates the beauty found in ordinary things, like a lone reaper working in a field. The speaker is captivated by the girl’s grace and the simple melody of her song, demonstrating the Romantic belief that true beauty can be found in everyday life, not just grand spectacles.

2. Nature as a Source of Inspiration: The vast valley and golden sunlight create a serene setting that inspires the speaker and amplifies the emotional impact of the song. Nature is not just a backdrop but an active participant in the experience, reflecting the Romantic view of nature as a source of inspiration and emotional connection.

3. Emphasis on Emotion: The poem focuses heavily on the speaker’s emotional response to the song. His feelings of wonder, longing, and sadness are central to the poem’s message. This aligns with the Romantic emphasis on individual emotions and the power of art to evoke them.

Overall, “The Solitary Reaper” captures the essence of Romanticism by celebrating the beauty found in the ordinary, the power of nature to inspire, the importance of individual emotions, and the lasting impact of beauty.

Q6. Explain the meaning of the following phrases:
(a) melancholy strain
(b) shady haunt
(c) plaintive numbers
(d) humble lay
(e) welcome notes

Ans. (a) melancholy strain: The word “melancholy” emphasizes the sadness and longing associated with the reaper’s song, while “strain” refers to the melody itself. This phrase sets the tone for the poem, suggesting a sense of sorrow and longing in the air.

(b) shady haunt: This phrase describes the solitary reaper’s location, suggesting a hidden or peaceful spot away from the harshness of the open fields. It creates a contrast between the bustling world and the tranquility of the reaper’s work.

(c) plaintive numbers: The word “plaintive” emphasizes the sorrowful nature of the song, while “numbers” refers to its rhythm and melody. This phrase suggests a simple yet emotional t song, adding depth and complexity to the reaper’s music.

(d) humble lay: This phrase contrasts with “plaintive numbers,” suggesting a less complex and more ordinary song. It might be about personal sorrows, common experiences, or even nature.

(e) welcome notes: This phrase describes how the speaker perceives the reaper’s song. It suggests that despite its melancholic nature, the song brings him a sense of comfort and solace. This highlights the power of music to transcend sadness and offer beauty and peace.


Q7. Describe the landscape and the reaper’s position within it. How does this setting contribute to the poem’s mood?
Ans. The landscape of “The Solitary Reaper” is vast and serene, painted with golden sunlight and vastness. Wordsworth uses vivid imagery to create a sense of both beauty and isolation.

The Valley: Sunlit fields, golden grain, and a “vale profound” all contribute to a sense of spaciousness and peace. The valley can symbolize both abundance and isolation. The sun-drenched valley creates a sense of tranquility and harmony with nature.

The Reaper: Described as “single in the field,” “solitary Highland Lass,” and “alone she cuts and binds the grain,” emphasizing her isolation within the vast landscape.
The reaper’s solitude adds a touch of melancholy and mystery to the poem, inviting the reader to wonder about her thoughts and the story behind her song.

The interplay between the vast, sunlit valley and the solitary reaper creates a contrasting mood of both peace and melancholy. The beauty of the landscape underscores the reaper’s isolation, adding a layer of depth and reflection to the poem. This setting sets the stage for the speaker’s encounter with the reaper’s song, preparing the reader for a powerful and emotionally charged experience.

Q8. Consider how the reaper’s song serves as a bridge between the two individuals, despite the lack of physical interaction.
Ans. The reaper’s song in “The Solitary Reaper” serves as a powerful bridge between the speaker and the reaper, despite the lack of physical interaction. Here are some ways this connection is established:

1. Emotional resonance: The speaker is deeply moved by the song, experiencing a range of emotions like sadness, longing, and wonder. This shared emotional response creates a bond between them, even though they don’t speak to each other. The song transcends words and connects them on a deeper, emotional level.

2. Shared experience: The song speaks of “old, unhappy, far-off things” and “some more humble lay,” hinting at shared human experiences of loss, sorrow, and everyday life. This creates a sense of empathy and understanding between the speaker and the reaper, despite their different circumstances.

3. Universal language of music: The song itself acts as a universal language that transcends individual differences. The speaker might not understand the specific words or stories, but the melody and emotions carried in the music bridge the gap between them.

In conclusion, the reaper’s song serves as a powerful bridge between the speaker and the reaper. It transcends the limitations of language and physical interaction, forging a connection through shared emotions, universal experiences, and the power of music to resonate with the human soul.

Q9. Critically appreciate the poem “The Solitary Reaper”.
Ans. William Wordsworth’s “The Solitary Reaper” is a simple poem that leaves an impact on the reader. It transcends mere description of a scene, delving into themes of beauty, isolation, and the transformative power of art. The poem is divided into four eight-line stanzas, each with an ABAB CDCD rhyme scheme.
Wordsworth paints a breathtaking picture of the sunlit valley and the solitary reaper working amidst the golden grain. Words like “boundless fields,” “sunlit slope,” and “golden grain” evoke a sense of vastness and tranquility. The poem engages not just the visual sense but also the reader’s imagination, making them feel like they’re standing alongside the speaker, witnessing the scene unfold.
The speaker’s ability to carry the music of the song in his heart long after the physical sound has faded (“The music in my heart I bore, / Long after it was heard no more”) highlights the enduring impact of art. This suggests that true beauty and meaningful experiences leave a lasting mark on our souls, enriching our inner lives.

Q10. Imagine that you are the poet, William Wordsworth. You continue on your walk, and when you reach home you write a letter to a friend about what you saw and felt.
Ans. ABC Highlands
Scotland
15th December 2023

My Dearest Friend,
My pen trembles as I write, still under the spell of a most enchanting experience. Today, my walk led me to a valley bathed in sunlight, a scene fit for a painting. But what truly stole my heart was not the landscape, but the song that filled it.

There, amongst the golden grain, stood a solitary Highland girl, reaping with grace. From her lips flowed a song so beautiful, it surpassed any nightingale, any cuckoo on a spring morning.
It was a melody woven from sorrow and joy, a whisper of battles long ago and the quiet hum of the present. I stood, mesmerized, unable to move, as the music washed over me like a wave, carrying me to a place beyond words.

The song’s meaning remains a mystery, a secret shared only by the wind and the girl. Even now, as I write, the echoes of that song linger in my soul, a precious gift that endures long after the sound itself has faded. It serves as a constant reminder of the beauty that surrounds us, waiting to be discovered.

Oh, my friend, I urge you to do the same. Seek out the simple wonders hidden in the world, for they are the true treasures of life.

With deepest affection,
William Wordsworth

 

 
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