The Brook Important Question Answers

 

CBSE  Class 9 English Literature Reader (Communicative) Chapter 6 The Brook Important Question Answers

 

The Brook Question Answers  – Looking for The Brook question answers for Class 9 English Literature Reader (Communicative) book Chapter 6? Look no further! Our comprehensive compilation of important questions will help you brush up on your subject knowledge. Practising Class 9 English Communicative question answers can significantly improve your performance in the exam. Our solutions provide a clear idea of how to write the answers effectively. Improve your chances of scoring high marks by exploring Chapter 6: The Brook now. The questions listed below are based on the latest CBSE exam pattern, wherein we have given solutions to the chapter’s extract based questions, short answer questions, and long answer questions. 

Also, practising with different kinds of questions can help students learn new ways to solve problems that they may not have seen before. This can ultimately lead to a deeper understanding of the subject matter and better performance on exams.  

 

 

 
 

Class 9 Communicative English The Brook Question Answers Chapter 6 – Extract Based Question

I. “I come from haunts of coot and hern,
I make a sudden sally,
And sparkle out among the fern,
To bicker down a valley.

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By thirty hills I hurry down,
Or slip between the ridges,
By twenty thorps, a little town,
And half a hundred bridges.”

1. Where does the brook originate, according to the first line?
a) From a forest
b) From a mountain spring
c) From the places frequently visited by water birds
d) From a hidden cave
Ans. c) From the places frequently visited by water birds

2. What does the phrase “sparkle out among the fern” suggest?
a) The brook is hidden and mysterious.
b) The brook sparkles when the sunshine reflects the crystal clear water.
c) The brook is moving quickly and forcefully.
d) The brook is shallow and clear.
Ans. b) The brook sparkles when the sunshine reflects the crystal clear water.

3. What does the word “bicker” suggest about the brook’s movement?
a) It is playful and carefree.
b) It is angry and destructive.
c) It is steady and constant.
d) It is unpredictable and erratic.
Ans. a) It is playful and carefree.

4. By how many hills does the brook pass, according to the fifth line?
a) Ten
b) Twenty
c) Thirty
d) Fifty
Ans. c) Thirty

5. What does the phrase “half a hundred bridges” suggest about the brook’s journey?
a) It is long and arduous.
b) It is peaceful and serene.
c) It is winding and unpredictable.
d) It is short and unremarkable.
Ans. a) It is long and arduous.

II. “Till last by Philip’s farm I flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on forever.

I chatter over stony ways,
In little sharps and trebles,
I bubble into eddying bays,
I babble on the pebbles.”

1. Where does the brook flow before joining another body of water?
a) By a bustling city
b) Through a dense forest
c) By Philip’s farm
d) Underneath a towering mountain
Ans. c) By Philip’s farm

2. What does the phrase “brimming river” suggest?
a) A fast-moving stream
b) A full and overflowing river
c) A narrow and winding brook
d) A calm and peaceful lake
Ans. b) A full and overflowing river

3. What line emphasizes the brook’s continuous flow?
a) “I chatter over stony ways”
b) “In little sharps and trebles”
c) “I bubble into eddying bays”
d) “But I go on forever”
Ans. d) “But I go on forever”

4. What type of sounds does the brook make?
a) Loud and booming
b) Sharp and high-pitched
c) Deep and rumbling
d) Soft and whispering
Ans. b) Sharp and high-pitched

5. Identify the poetic device used in- “I babble on the pebbles ”
a) Personification
b) Imagery
c) Metaphor
d) Onomatopoeia
Ans. d) Onomatopoeia

 

III. “With many a curve my banks I fret
by many a field and fallow,
And many a fairy foreland set
With willow-weed and mallow.

I chatter, chatter, as I flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on forever.”

1. What does the phrase “many a curve” suggest about the brook’s path?
a) It is straight and direct.
b) It is winding and meandering.
c) It is narrow and confined.
d) It is steep and treacherous.
Ans. b) It is winding and meandering.

2. What type of land does the brook flow by, according to the second line?
a) Dense forests
b) Fields and fallow land
c) Rocky mountains
d) Sandy beaches
Ans. b) Fields and fallow land

3. What image is created by the phrase “fairy foreland set” ?
a) A dark and mysterious forest
b) A beautiful and enchanting meadow
c) A bustling city marketplace
d) A barren and desolate wasteland
Ans. b) A beautiful and enchanting meadow

4. What are some of the plants found growing along the brook’s banks?
a) Oak trees and pine trees
b) Willow-weed and mallow
c) Roses and lilies
d) Cactus and desert plants
Ans. b) Willow-weed and mallow

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5. What does the repeated line “I chatter, chatter, as I flow” emphasize?
a) The brook’s anger and frustration
b) The brook’s continuous movement and sound
c) The brook’s fear of the future
d) The brook’s desire to join the river
Ans. b) The brook’s continuous movement and sound

6. Identify the poetic device. “I chatter, chatter, as I flow ”
a) Personification
b) Imagery
c) Metaphor
d) Simile
Ans. a) Personification

IV. “I wind about, and in and out,
with here a blossom sailing,
And here and there a lusty trout,
And here and there a grayling,

And here and there a foamy flake
Upon me, as I travel
With many a silver water-break
Above the golden gravel,

And draw them all along, and flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on forever.”

1. What image is created by the phrase “here a blossom sailing”?
a) A storm brewing on the river
b) A flock of birds flying overhead
c) A flower petal floating on the water
d) A fish jumping out of the water
Ans. c) A flower petal floating on the water

2. What type of fish are mentioned in the poem?
a) Salmon and cod
b) Lusty trout and grayling
c) Piranhas and eels
d) Goldfish and koi
Ans. b) Lusty trout and grayling

3. What does the phrase “foamy flake” describe?
a) A cloud passing in the sky
b) Bubbles forming on the water
c) A leaf floating on the surface
d) A bird flying over the water
Ans. b) Bubbles forming on the water

4. What image is created by the phrase “golden gravel”?
a) The setting sun reflecting on the water
b) Small pebbles on the bottom of the brook
c) Sand dunes along the riverbank
d) A treasure chest buried in the river
Ans. b) Small pebbles on the bottom of the brook

5. Who is the author of this poem?
a) William Wordsworth
b) Alfred Tennyson
c) Emily Dickinson
d) Robert Frost
Ans. b) Alfred Tennyson

 

V. “I steal by lawns and grassy plots,
I slide by hazel covers;
I move the sweet forget-me-nots
That grow for happy lovers.

I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance,
Among my skimming swallows;
I make the netted sunbeam dance
Against my sandy shallows.”

1. What does the brook do to the forget-me-nots?
a) Crushes them under its flow
b) Gently brushes against them
c) Uproots them and carries them away
d) Ignores them completely
Ans. b) Gently brushes against them

2. What does the phrase “hazel covers” refer to?
a) Areas of tall grass
b) Thickets of hazel trees
c) Patches of wildflowers
d) Shallow pools of water
Ans. b) Thickets of hazel trees

3. What type of movement is described in the line “I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance”?
a) Fast and erratic
b) Slow and steady
c) Powerful and forceful
d) Smooth and graceful
Ans. a) Fast and erratic

4. What is the effect of the “netted sunbeam” on the sandy shallows?
a) It creates a shimmering reflection.
b) It warms the water and makes it sparkle.
c) It casts a long, dark shadow.
d) It creates a pattern of light and dark patches.
Ans. b) It warms the water and makes it sparkle.

VI. “I murmur under moon and stars
In brambly wildernesses;
I linger by my shingly bars;
I loiter round my cresses;

And out again I curve and flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on forever.”

1. What does the phrase “brambly wildernesses” describe?
a) Lush meadows and fields
b) Thickets of thorny blackberry bushes
c) Tranquil forests and woodlands
d) Bare and barren hillsides
Ans. b) Thickets of thorny blackberry bushes

2. What is the meaning of the word “cresses” in this context?
a) Small pebbles or stones
b) Watercress, a type of aquatic plant
c) Ripples and waves on the water’s surface
d) Small fish that live in the brook
Ans. b) Watercress, a type of aquatic plant

3. What does the line “And out again I curve and flow” describe?
a) The brook comes to a complete stop.
b) The brook changes direction and continues its journey.
c) The brook splits into two separate streams.
d) The brook overflows its banks and floods the land.
Ans. b) The brook changes direction and continues its journey.

4. What does the repeated line “For men may come and men may go, / But I go on forever” emphasize?
a) The importance of human relationships
b) The power of nature and its enduring presence
c) The fleeting nature of human life compared to the eternal flow of nature
d) The beauty and serenity of the natural world
Ans. c) The fleeting nature of human life compared to the eternal flow of nature

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Class 9 Communicative English The Brook Short Question Answers

Q1. Where does the brook originate?
Ans. The poem does not explicitly state where the brook originates, but the first line gives us a clue: “I come from haunts of coot and hern.” This suggests that the brook begins in a marshy or wetland area frequented by birds like coots and herons.

Q2. What is the overall impression created by the final stanza?
Ans. The final stanza evokes a sense of peace and serenity, with the brook flowing quietly under the moon and stars. It reinforces the poem’s message of the enduring nature of the natural world even as individual lives come and go.

Q3. What are some of the sounds the brook makes as it flows?
Ans. The brook chatters, babbles, bubbles, and murmurs, creating a symphony of sounds that reflect its lively nature.

Q4. What image is created by the phrase ‘netted sunbeam’?
Ans. The phrase “netted sunbeam” creates an image of sunlight filtering through leaves and branches, forming a dappled pattern on the water’s surface.

Q5. What does the phrase ‘brimming river’ evoke?
Ans. The phrase “brimming river” evokes a sense of abundance and power, suggesting that the river is large and full of life.

Q6. What does the brook do to the forget-me-nots?
Ans. The brook gently brushes against the forget-me-nots, suggesting a delicate and nurturing touch.

Q7. What is the significance of the repeated line ‘For men may come and men may go, / But I go on forever’?
Ans. This repeated line emphasizes the permanence and enduring nature of the brook compared to the fleeting lives of humans. The brook symbolizes the continuous flow of life, while humans are temporary figures.

Q8. What does the word ‘bicker’ suggest about the brook’s movement?
Ans. The word “bicker” suggests a playful and slightly rambunctious movement, indicating that the brook is not flowing smoothly but rather tumbling and gurgling over rocks.

Q9. Discuss the importance of the various places that the brook encounters on its journey.
Ans. The brook passes thirty hills and fifty bridges. It chatters and babbles and creates music as it flows. It travels through hills and vales, between ridges and underbridges, Philip’s farm, fallow land and foreland, making its way through, with a blossom here and a trout there and many a grayling through obstructions of sand and gravel until it falls into the big river.

Q10. What does the poet want to convey through the poem, ‘The Brook’ ?
Ans. The brook is a symbol of the struggle of human life. The poet wishes to point out that just as ups and down do not deter the brook from its journey, similarly, human beings should also take the hurdles and sorrows in their stride.

Q11. What is the main theme of “The Brook”?
Ans. The main theme of the poem is the contrast between the fleeting nature of human life and the enduring power of the natural world. The brook’s continuous flow symbolizes the ever-changing cycle of life and death, while the men who come and go represent the transient nature of human existence.

Q12. How is the journey of the brook similar to the journey of life and yet different?
Ans. There are various similarities between the brook and the journey of life, e.g., both have a beginning, a middle age and an end. There are struggles in the lives of both — the human life continues inspite of struggles and ups and downs and the brook continues to flow against all odds. But one thing is different — man is mortal, whereas the brook is eternal, man may come and man may go but the brook goes on forever.

Q13. What is the significance of the brook’s journey towards the river?
Ans. The brook overcomes many hurdles and obstacles in its journey bravely and reaches its final destination, the river in the same way human beings should also remain undeterred to accept the joys and sorrows of life and face all the obstacles that come in way of their aim, bravely.

Q14. Who is the speaker in “The Brook”?
Ans. The speaker of the poem is the brook itself. A small but lively stream, the brook seeks to merge with “the brimming river” and become part of something bigger than itself. Throughout the poem, it remains committed to this goal.

Q15. Discuss the metaphor in the poem.
Ans. In the poem, the brook’s journey “to join the brimming river” represents the course of a human life—a person’s journey from birth to death. This metaphor highlights the similarities between both journeys, like the way that the brook transforms from a lively, energetic little brook to a languid stream just like an energetic child gradually growing into adulthood and then old age.

Q16. What are your overall thoughts and feelings on the poem?
Ans. “The Brook” is a beautiful and evocative poem that leaves me with a sense of peace and wonder. I am captivated by its vivid imagery and lyrical language, which paint a mesmerizing picture of the brook’s journey. The poem’s exploration of profound themes such as the contrast between human existence and the enduring nature of life adds depth and meaning to its message.

 

 
 

Class 9 Communicative English The Brook Long Answer Questions Chapter 6

Q1. How does the brook move between the ridges?
Ans. The poem “The Brook” by Alfred Lord Tennyson provides a brief description of the brook’s movement between the ridges:

“By thirty hills I hurry down,
Or slip between the ridges,”

This suggests two different ways in which the brook navigates the landscape:

  1. Hurrying down: This implies a faster, more direct movement, where the brook descends the hills with a certain force and momentum.
  2. Slipping between the ridges: This describes a gentler, more subtle movement, where the brook finds its way through the valleys and gaps between the hills, adapting to the contours of the terrain.
  3. The contrast between these two movements highlights the dynamic nature of the brook. It can be both forceful and adaptable, changing its pace and direction as needed.

 

Q2. What is the overall impression created by the final stanza?
Ans. The final stanza of “The Brook” leaves a lasting impression of peace, serenity, and the enduring cycle of life. Here’s a breakdown of the key elements that contribute to this impression:

  1. Setting: The scene takes place under the moon and stars, suggesting a tranquil and peaceful night time atmosphere. 
  2. Sound: The brook murmurs softly, adding to the overall tranquility and suggesting a quiet and introspective mood.
  3. Movement: The brook continues to flow and curve, but its movement seems less hurried and more deliberate, signifying its continued journey and the cyclical nature of life.
  4. Contrast: The final repetition of the refrain, “For men may come and men may go, / But I go on forever,” reinforces the poem’s central theme. It reminds us that the natural world, represented by the brook, is eternal and ever-changing, while human lives are fleeting and temporary.

 

Overall, the final stanza leaves a sense of awe and wonder at the natural world’s resilience and the constant flow of life.

 

Q3. How does the poem relate to the natural world?
Ans. “The Brook” intimately relates to the natural world in several key ways:

  1. Celebration of nature: The poem presents a vivid portrayal of a brook, its journey, and its surroundings, showcasing the beauty and diversity of nature. The detailed descriptions of the brook’s movements, sounds, and interactions with the environment create a sense of appreciation for the natural world and its inherent wonder.
  2. Use of imagery: The poem uses vivid imagery to paint a picture of the brook and its surrounding environment. The reader can almost hear the gurgling water, feel the sunlight on the water’s surface, and smell the flowers growing along the banks. This sensory experience allows the reader to feel immersed in the natural world and connect with it on a deeper level.
  3. Personification of the brook: The poem personifies the brook, giving it living-being qualities and characteristics. This allows the reader to connect with the brook on a more personal level and appreciate its agency and resilience. The brook becomes a symbol of the natural world’s power and ability to overcome challenges and continue its journey.
  4. Appreciation of the simple things: The poem celebrates the beauty and wonder of the natural world, even in the simplest things. The brook, with its constant flow and interaction with its surroundings, becomes a symbol of the beauty and complexity found in the everyday aspects of nature.
  5. Call to appreciate the natural world: Through its celebration of the brook and its connection to the natural world, the poem encourages readers to appreciate the environment and its importance. It serves as a reminder to take time to observe and connect with nature, recognizing its enduring presence and value.

 

“The Brook” beautifully portrays the natural world, celebrating its beauty, complexity, and cyclical nature. It encourages readers to appreciate the environment and recognize its importance in our lives.

Q4. How does the poem relate to human existence?
Ans. The poem “The Brook” relates to human existence in various profound ways:

  1. Mortality vs. Continuity: The poem’s central theme contrasts the transience of human life (“men may come and men may go”) with the enduring presence of the natural world (“I go on forever”). This stark juxtaposition prompts readers to contemplate their own mortality and the larger context of their existence within the vastness of nature.
  2. Flow and Change: The brook’s continuous flow serves as a metaphor for the constant change and flux inherent in human life. Just as the brook encounters obstacles and alters its course, humans navigate challenges and adapt to changing circumstances. This parallel reflects the dynamism and inevitability of change in both the natural world and human experience.
  3. Resilience and Perseverance: Despite encountering hurdles like “thirty hills” and “brambly wildernesses,” the brook continues its journey. This exemplifies resilience and perseverance, reminding humans of their own capacity to overcome challenges and persist through difficulties.
  4. Harmony and Connection: The poem depicts the brook interacting with various elements of its environment, such as the “forget-me-nots” and the “skimming swallows.” This harmonious relationship between the brook and its surroundings mirrors the interconnectedness of all living things, highlighting the importance of living in balance with nature.
  5. Finding Peace in Nature: The poem’s peaceful imagery and soothing sounds, like the murmuring water and the “silver water-break,” offer a sense of tranquility and respite. This reflects the potential of nature to provide solace and comfort to humans, reminding us to seek peace and rejuvenation within the natural world.

 

Overall, “The Brook” offers valuable insights into the human condition by mirroring its complexities and celebrating the enduring power of nature.

Q5. Write a critical appreciation of the poem “The Brook”.
Ans. The Brook by Alfred Lord Tennyson is a beautiful poem celebrating the natural world and the enduring power of life. It achieves this through its vivid imagery, masterful use of language, and exploration of profound themes.
The poem is divided into thirteen stanzas, each containing four lines. Each stanza describes a specific aspect of the brook’s journey or its interaction with its surroundings. The poem has a cyclical structure, beginning and ending with the brook’s flow.

The poem celebrates the beauty and resilience of the natural world. The brook is portrayed as a life-giving force that nourishes the environment and provides solace to humans.
The poem delves into the contrast between the fleeting nature of human life and the enduring flow of nature. This theme is emphasized by the repeated refrain and the contrast between the men who “come and go” and the brook that “goes on forever.”
The poem employs vivid descriptions that bring the brook to life. From the “sparkle out among the fern” to the “silver water-break,” the reader can almost hear the gurgling water and feel the sunlight on their skin.

“The Brook” is a beautiful and timeless poem that celebrates the wonder and resilience of the natural world. It leaves a lasting impression on the reader, encouraging them to appreciate the beauty and fragility of our planet. The poem’s enduring popularity is a testament to its lyrical beauty, profound themes, and timeless message.

 

Q6. Write an autobiography of the brook before it meets the river.
Ans. I begin my journey as a mere trickle, a whisper of water seeping through the earth. My path is uncertain, guided by the gentle slope of the land, carving my way through mossy stones and tangled roots.
As I grew, so did my voice. From a timid gurgling to a playful babble, I sang my way down the mountainside. Along the way, I met others like me, joining their voices to mine, forming a chorus that echoed through the valley.
My journey wasn’t always smooth. There were steep ravines to descend, treacherous boulders to navigate, and scorching days that threatened to dry my very essence. But with each challenge, I grew stronger, learning to carve my own path, leaving a winding trail of life in my wake.
The forest thrived under my care, and in return, its beauty nourished my soul.As I grew larger, my reach extended beyond the forest. I encountered farms and villages, witnessing the lives of humans unfold along my banks. I listened to their stories, their laughter and their tears, becoming a silent witness to their joys and sorrows.
And then, I felt it. A pull, an irresistible force drawing me towards it. The river, vast and powerful, beckoned with its ancient song. I plunge into the river’s embrace, my identity merging with its mighty flow.
And so, the tale of the brook lives on. It whispers through the leaves, gurgles over stones, and dances in the sunlight. It is a testament to the enduring power of life, a reminder that we are all connected, part of a grander river flowing towards the endless sea.

Q7. If the brook could speak, what would it tell the men who “come and go”?
Ans. If the brook could speak, it would likely have many things to say to the men who “come and go.” Here are some potential messages it might convey:

  1. A plea for respect and care: The brook might urge the men to treat it with respect and care, reminding them of its importance to the environment and all living things. It might express its pain at the pollution it endures and the harm inflicted upon its ecosystem.
  2. A call for action: The brook might implore the men to take action to protect it and the environment as a whole. It could encourage them to reduce pollution, conserve resources, and adopt sustainable practices.
  3. A message of hope and resilience: Despite the challenges it faces, the brook might offer a message of hope and resilience. It could assure the men that it will continue to flow, even in the face of adversity, and encourage them to never lose hope in the possibility of positive change.
  4. A story of the past and future: The brook might share its memories of the past, when the water was clean and the environment flourished. It could then paint a picture of a brighter future, where humans and nature co-exist in harmony.

 

Ultimately, the message the brook conveys would be one of wisdom, awareness, and hope, urging the men to take responsibility for their actions and work towards a more sustainable future for all.

 

Q8. How would the poem change if the brook were polluted or faced environmental challenges?

Ans. If the brook were polluted or faced environmental challenges, the poem would likely undergo significant changes in tone, imagery, and theme. Here are some potential alterations:

  • Tone: The poem’s overall tone, currently serene and celebratory, would shift to a more somber and lamenting tone, reflecting the brook’s suffering and the damage inflicted upon it. A sense of urgency and concern would permeate the poem, highlighting the need for action to protect the environment.
  • Imagery: The vivid descriptions of the brook’s sparkling water, lush vegetation, and playful creatures would be replaced with images of polluted water, barren banks, and struggling wildlife.Darker imagery might be employed, such as references to murky depths, foul odors, and choked waterways.
  • Theme: The contrast between the enduring nature of the brook and the fleeting lives of humans might still exist, but it would be overshadowed by the theme of environmental degradation and the consequences of human actions.

 

Q9. What are some of the things the brook encounters on its journey?

Ans. The brook encounters a variety of things on its journey, including:

  • The coot and the heron: At the beginning of its journey, the brook emerges from a place frequented by these birds.
  • Philip’s farm: The brook flows through Philip’s farm, highlighting its role in sustaining agriculture.
  • Hills and valleys: The brook “hurries down” thirty hills and flows through numerous valleys.
  • Flowers and plants: The brook nourishes various wildflowers, forget-me-nots, and other vegetation along its banks.
  • Animals: The brook interacts with various creatures like trout, grayling, and skimming swallows.
  • Farms and villages: The brook passes through farmlands and villages, showcasing the interaction between nature and human settlements
  • The big river: The brook’s ultimate destination, representing the merging of individual streams into a larger body of water.

 

Q10. What all poetic devices are used in “The Brook” by Alfred Lord Tennyson?

Ans. The Brook uses various poetic devices to create a vivid and engaging portrayal of the brook’s journey. Here are some of the key devices used:

  1. Personification: The brook is given human qualities like speech (chatter, murmur), movement (flow, curve, slide), and emotions (playful, happy, gloomy). This personification allows the poet to express the brook’s liveliness and connect with the reader on an emotional level.

Example:

  • “I chatter, chatter, as I flow”
  • “I slide by lawns and grassy plots”
  • “I make the netted sunbeam dance”

 

  1. Imagery: Vivid descriptions using sensory details help the reader visualize the brook’s journey. The poem uses sight, sound, and touch to bring the brook to life.

Example:

  • “I sparkle out among the fern”
  • “I bicker down a valley”
  • “I babble on the pebbles”
  • “With many a silver water-break / Above the golden gravel”

 

  1. Repetition: The lines “For men may come and men may go, / But I go on forever” are repeated throughout the poem, emphasizing the brook’s immortality and contrasting it with the fleeting nature of human life.
  2. Alliteration: The repeated consonant sounds add musicality to the poem and help create a sense of rhythm and flow.

Example:

  • “By thirty hills I hurry down”
  • “Twenty thorpes, a little town”
  • “With many a curve my banks I fret”

 

  1. Simile: The poem uses similes to compare the brook to other objects or creatures, further enriching the imagery.

Example:

  • “And here a blossom sailing, / And here and there a lusty trout”
  • “I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance, / Among my skimming swallows”

 

  1. Metaphor: The poem also uses metaphors to create a more symbolic meaning.

Example:

  • “With many a fairy foreland set” (comparing the land by the brook to a fairyland)
  1. Onomatopoeia: The use of words that sound like the sounds they represent adds to the poem’s sensory experience.

Example:

  • “I chatter, chatter, as I flow”
  • “I babble on the pebbles”

 

  1. Anaphora: The repetition of words or phrases at the beginning of lines adds emphasis and creates a sense of unity.

Example:

  • “By thirty hills I hurry down, / Or slip between the ridges”
  • “I steal by lawns and grassy plots, / I slide by hazel covers”

 

Q11. Write a letter to your friend sharing your feelings upon seeing a beautiful river flowing.
Ans. (Informal Letter)
Z Lane,
Haridwar, India
13 December 2023

Dearest friend
I’m writing to you from the banks of the mighty River Ganga in Haridwar, a place that has left an indelible mark on my soul. Words fail to capture the sight.
As I stood on the ghats, mesmerized by the river’s ceaseless flow, a sense of peace washed over me. The serenity of the river, the unwavering faith of the pilgrims, and the ancient wisdom that permeates the air all contribute to a sense of spiritual renewal.

The sight of the river Ganga in Haridwar has filled me with a newfound appreciation for the beauty and sanctity of nature, the power of faith, and the interconnectedness of all things. It is an experience that I will cherish forever.

With love,
ABC

 

 
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