The Bishop’s Candlesticks Important Question Answers

 

CBSE  Class 9 English Literature Reader (Communicative) Chapter 13 The Bishop’s Candlesticks Important Question Answers

 

The Bishop’s Candlesticks Question Answers  – Looking for The Bishop’s Candlesticks question answers for Class 9 English Literature Reader (Communicative) book Chapter 13? Look no further! Our comprehensive compilation of important questions will help you brush up on your subject knowledge. Practising Class 9 English Communicative question answers can significantly improve your performance in the exam. Our solutions provide a clear idea of how to write the answers effectively. Improve your chances of scoring high marks by exploring Chapter 13: The Bishop’s Candlesticks now. The questions listed below are based on the latest CBSE exam pattern, wherein we have given solutions to the chapter’s extract based questions, short answer questions, and long answer questions. 

 

Also, practising with different kinds of questions can help students learn new ways to solve problems that they may not have seen before. This can ultimately lead to a deeper understanding of the subject matter and better performance on exams.  

 

 

 

Class 9 Communicative English The Bishop’s Candlesticks Question Answers Chapter 13 – Extract Based Question

I. “Persome : You told him she was feeling poorly did you? And so my brother is to be kept out
of his bed, and go without his supper because you told him she was feeling poorly. There’s gratitude for you!
Marie: Madam, the soup is boiling!
Persome: Then pour it out, fool, and don’t chatter.No, no, not like that. Here, let me do it, and do you put the salt-cellars on the table-the silver ones.
Marie: The silver ones, Madam?
Persome: Yes, the silver ones. Are you deaf as well as stupid?
Marie: They are sold, madam.
Persome: Sold! (with horror) Sold! Are you mad? Who sold them? Why were they sold?”

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1. Who is Persome referring to when she says “my brother” in the first line?
a) The Convict
b) The Bishop
c) A priest at the church
d) None of the above
Answer: b) The Bishop

2. Why is Persome upset with Marie in the beginning?
a) Marie forgot to make soup.
b) Marie told the Bishop about her mother’s illness.
c) Marie sold the silver salt-cellars without permission.
d) Marie spoke back to Persome.
Answer: b) Marie told the Bishop about her mother’s illness.

3. What is the likely reason Persome is horrified that the salt-cellars were sold?
a) They were family heirlooms.
b) They were very valuable.
c) The Bishop needed them for a ceremony.
d) They were a gift from Monseigneur Gervais.
Answer: b) They were very valuable.

4. Who is Marie?
a) The househelp at bishop’s house
b) The landlady
c) A visitor
d) A distant relative
Answer: a) The househelp at bishop’s house

5. Which of the following images resonates with silver salt cellars?

bishops candlesticks

Answer: c)

II. “Persome: And now my beautiful-beautiful (sob) salt-cellars. (She breaks down crying.)
Marie: Madam, I am sorry, if I had known
Persome: Sorry, and why pray? If Monseigneur the Bishop chooses to sell his salt-cellars he may do so, I suppose. Go and wash your hands, they are disgracefully dirty.
Bishop: Ah! how nice and warm! It is worth going out in the cold for the sake of
the comfort of coming in.
Bishop: Thank you, dear. (Looking at her.) Why, what is the matter ? You have been
crying. Has Marie been troublesome, eh ?”

1. What reason does Persome give for their desperate situation?
a) The Bishop has become ill.
b) They have a large debt to pay.
c) The Bishop has been extravagant with his charity.
d) All of the above
Answer: c) The Bishop has been extravagant with his charity.

2. How does the Bishop react upon entering the scene?
a) He notices Persome’s distress immediately.
b) He is unaware of the tension in the room.
c) He is preoccupied with the cold weather.
d) He scolds Persome for her appearance.
Answer: a) He notices Persome’s distress immediately.

3. Choose the most appropriate meaning of the word “Monseigneur”.
a) A supreme religious and political leader
b) A title before the name of a French prince or other dignitary
c) A title for a married Frenchwoman
d) A title for an unmarried person
Answer: b) A title before the name of a French prince or other dignitary

4. Who is Persome?
a) Bishop’s wife
b) Bishop’s sister
c) Bishop’s daughter
d) Bishop’s niece
Answer: b) Bishop’s sister

5. Based on the extract, what can you infer about the Bishop’s relationship with Persome?
a) He is oblivious to her struggles and feelings.
b) He is aware of her distress but chooses to ignore it.
c) He is concerned about her but feels helpless to help.
d) He is dismissive.
Answer: a) He is oblivious to her struggles and feelings.

III. “Bishop: Now tell me about the prison ship, about Hell.
Convict: I was a man once. I’m a beast now, and they made me what I am. They chained me up like a wild animal, they lashed me like a hound. I fed on filth, I was covered, with vermin, I slept on boards, and I complained. Then they lashed me again. For ten years, ten years. Oh God! They took away my name, they took away my soul, and they gave me a devil in its place. But one day they were careless, one day they forgot to chain up their wild beast, and he escaped. He was free. That was six weeks ago. I was free, free to starve.
Bishop: To starve ?
Convict: Yes, to starve.”

1. What is the main theme explored in the conversation between the Bishop and the Convict?
a) The power of religion in overcoming hardship.
b) The brutalizing effects of imprisonment and injustice.
c) The struggle for survival and the meaning of freedom.
d) The contrast between divine grace and human cruelty.
Answer: b) The brutalizing effects of imprisonment and injustice.

2. What specific detail highlights the dehumanization experienced by the Convict?
a) The loss of his name.
b) The constant hunger.
c) The presence of vermin.
d) The physical abuse.
Answer: a) The loss of his name.

3. When the Convict says “they gave me a devil in its place,” what does he likely mean?
a) He became possessed by an evil spirit.
b) He lost his faith in God
c) He adopted the survival instincts and brutality of his environment.
d) He developed a mental illness due to the trauma.
Answer: c) He adopted the survival instincts and brutality of his environment.

4. What is the irony in the Convict’s statement, “I was free, free to starve”?
a) He was finally a free man.
b) His freedom is limited by his lack of resources.
c) He was starved in jail.
d) He craved food they served in jail.
Answer: b) His freedom is limited by his lack of resources.

5. How does the Convict describe his experience on the prison ship?
a) He becomes spiritual
b) He grew stronger
c) He was treated like a wild animal
d) He made good friends in jail.
Answer: c) He was treated like a wild animal

IV. “Bishop: I have told you he is my friend.
Sergeant: Yes, that’s all very well, but
Bishop: He is your Bishop’s friend; surely that is enough.
Sergeant: Well, but
Bishop: Surely?
Sergeant: I-I-Humph! (To his men) Loose the prisoner. (They do so). Right about turn, quick
march!
Convict: (Very slowly, as if in a dream). You told them you had given me the candlesticks – By God!”

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1. What is the main point of conflict between the Bishop and the Sergeant?
a) The Bishop’s authority versus the Sergeant’s duty.
b) The rightful owner of the candlesticks.
c) The safety of the Bishop and the prisoner.
d) The morality of releasing the Convict.
Answer: a) The Bishop’s authority versus the Sergeant’s duty.

2. What is the Convict’s initial reaction to learning the Bishop claims to have given him the candlesticks?
a) Gratitude and relief
b) Suspicious
c) Disbelief and confusion
d) Angry
Answer: c) Disbelief and confusion

3. What does the Convict’s exclamation, “By God!” likely suggest?
a) He is invoking divine justice
b) He is grateful to the Bishop for his help
c) He is still struggling to comprehend the unexpected turn of events
d) He is questioning the Bishop’s sincerity and motives
Answer: c) He is still struggling to comprehend the unexpected turn of events

4. Why does the Bishop lie to the Sergeant?
a) To save the Convict from being sent to prison once again
b) Bishop did not like the Sergeant
c) Bishop was a dishonest citizen
d) Convict threatened the Bishop to lie for him
Answer: a) To save the Convict from being sent to prison once again

5. Which of the following images resonates with a bishop?

bishop

Answer: b)

 

 
 

Class 9 Communicative English The Bishop’s Candlesticks Short Question Answers

1. What makes Persome angry with Marie?
Ans. The Bishop has gone out in the extreme cold without informing Persome. When she learns from the maid, Marie, that he has gone to see Marie’s ailing mother, she loses her temper.

2. What complaints does Persome have regarding her brother?
Ans. Persome is the Bishop’s sister. The bishop has a habit of providing support to everyone who asks. To help the underprivileged, he has sold his furnishings, estate, and several other valuables.Persome is frustrated due to her brother’s excessive generosity even sacrificing their own comfort and security.

3. Why does Persome start to sob?
Ans. Persome is already hurt by her brother’s generosity. She is shocked and saddened to learn that he sold his silver salt cellars to help an elderly woman in paying her rent. The loss of silver salt cellars makes her cry.

4. How and when does the convict enter the Bishop’s room?
Ans. It is almost midnight. The Bishop is reading in his room. The convict enters his room stealthily. It is not difficult for anyone to enter the Bishop’s house as its doors and windows are never shut.

5. How does the convict behave when he encounters the Bishop?
Ans. The convict enters the Bishop’s room stealthily. He seizes the Bishop from behind and demands something to eat at once. He threatens to murder him if he raises an alarm.

6. How does the Bishop react to the threats?
Ans. Despite being threatened with a knife, the bishop shows no fear or aggression. He calmly asks the convict what he needs and addresses him as “my friend” and “my son,” demonstrating care and compassion.

7. What did the convict demand from the Bishop when he first entered the house?
Ans. When the convict first broke into the Bishop’s cottage, he demanded food, telling the Bishop he was starving and hadn’t eaten in three days. He threatened the Bishop with a knife, demanding to be fed quickly.

8. Why was the convict caught and imprisoned?
Ans. The convict’s wife had been unwell and starving. At the time, he was jobless and had no money. His ailing wife needed food, so he had to steal. He was caught red handed and sent to jail for theft.

9. Why does the convict call the prison a hell?
Ans. The convict describes his time inside as being nothing less than hell. He was chained like an animal. He was fed filth. They forced him to sleep on boards. He had rodent problems. He was frequently severely beaten. This treatment turned him into a beast.

10. Who was Jeanette? What was the cause of her death?
Ans. Jeanette was the convict’s wife. She fell seriously ill. The convict went out to procure food for his ailing wife. He had no money to feed and treat her. When he stole and got arrested, she died of starvation.

11. Why does the Bishop lie to the Sergeant?
Ans. When the Convict was caught by the police for stealing the Bishop’s candlesticks, the Bishop lied to the Sergeant that he was his friend and he had given him the silver candlesticks. By doing so, he saved the Convict from being sent to prison once again.

12. Do you justify the Bishop’s behaviour in not handing over the convict to the police?
Ans. The convict would never have had another opportunity to turn his life around if the Bishop had turned him over to the authorities. The Bishop saves him from the cops because he wants to offer him a second shot at life.

13. What brings about real transformation in the convict?
Ans. When the Bishop gives the convict his silver candlesticks as a gift before he leaves for Paris, the convict is speechless. He falls on his knees and sobs in front of the bishop. He believes that he has returned to being a “man.” His tears are a symbol of his transformation.

14. Do you think the punishment given to the convict was justified? Why/ Why not?
Ans. The punishment given to the convict for a theft was too much and was unjustified. His circumstances had forced him to steal. The jail time caused him great suffering with no hope of improvement.

15. Before leaving, the convict asks the Bishop to bless him. What brought about this change in him?
Ans. The prisoner had given up on goodness altogether. The Bishop’s love, kindness and generosity bring about a remarkable change in him. It’s as if he was a man again. He starts to believe in God again. So he seeks a blessing from the bishop.

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Class 9 Communicative English The Bishop’s Candlesticks Long Answer Questions Chapter 13

Q1. ‘It is easy to close the doors but difficult to open a window.’ Comment with reference to the play ‘The Bishop’s Candlesticks’.
Ans. The statement, “It is easy to close the doors but difficult to open a window,” holds deep meaning within the context of “The Bishop’s Candlesticks.” The Bishop represents compassion and openness, offering the convict food and warmth. However, societal norms and fear can easily “close the doors” on those deemed criminals or outsiders. The prison itself is a literal closed door, symbolizing the ease with which someone can be shut out from society.

True transformation requires the individual to open a window within themselves, allowing light and new perspectives to enter. The Bishop’s act of kindness becomes a catalyst for this potential change, offering the convict a glimpse of hope and the possibility of stepping out of his self-imposed darkness.
The Bishop chooses to open a window of faith by offering the convict not just food and shelter, but also acceptance and understanding. He believes in the human capacity for change and redemption.

Q2. ‘Minds are open only when hearts are open. Keeping this in mind, the Bishop’s house had unshuttered windows and unbarred doors for thirty years. Discuss.
Ans. The statement, “Minds are open only when hearts are open. Keeping this in mind, the Bishop’s house had unshuttered windows and unbarred doors for thirty years,” offers an insight on the Bishop’s character and the message of “The Bishop’s Candlesticks.”
The Bishop keeps the doors and windows open so that the poor and the needy could come anytime to his house. It reveals that his mind and heart are open. He is so generous and magnanimous that he attaches no importance to any material thing. He sells his estate, his silver salt-cellars and many others valuable things to help the poor. Though he cherishes his silver candlesticks, he readily gifts them to the convict.
Persome warns the Bishop earlier in the play about how people exploit his charity. He is even made fun of by the prisoner for leaving his doors and windows open. Despite being threatened with a knife the Bishop still does not close his cottage doors.
The Bishop’s house serves as a powerful symbol of this potential, inviting us to challenge closed doors and step into a world filled with compassion, empathy, and hope.

Q3. The prison is meant for reformation, not punishment. Justify this statement with reference to the lesson ‘The Bishop’s Candlesticks’.
Ans. The Bishop makes no attempt to judge or condemn the convict. Instead, he tries to understand the circumstances that led him to prison and the pain he carries within.
Bishop feeds the convict but still he steals the Bishop’s prized possession. This could be interpreted as evidence that some criminals are beyond redemption and require stricter forms of punishment to deter future offences.
Later in the play through Bishop’s kindness and understanding, the Bishop shows that even someone deemed a hardened criminal like the convict can be capable of change. This suggests that a prison environment focused on compassion and rehabilitation, rather than solely punishment, might unlock the potential for positive transformation in inmates.
The Bishop’s act of forgiving the convict and encouraging him to find a new path in life demonstrates a belief in the possibility of redemption and second chances.

Q4. Bishop’s character encompasses vibrant colours of compassion. Discuss.
Ans. Bishop is a loving and self-sacrificing person. He was ready to help anyone in need. He would go out in the chilly weather to see ailing acquaintances. He didn’t hesitate to sell his house-hold materials to help an elderly woman pay her rent.His home, with its unshuttered windows and unbarred doors, stands as a testament to his boundless generosity. One night, a convict enters his home and steals his only possession, the candlesticks given to him by his mother. He welcomes the convict, not with judgement, but with warmth and food, offering solace to a soul battered by darkness. This innate kindliness becomes a beacon, drawing in the lost and broken, offering them a safe harbor from the storms of life.
The Bishop in “The Bishop’s Candlesticks” is not merely a character, but a canvas splashed with vibrant colours of compassion, unwavering faith, and quiet courage.

Q5. Persome is more practical than the Bishop. Discuss..
Ans. Persome and the Bishop in “The Bishop’s Candlesticks” exhibit contrasting worldviews, with Persome leaning towards practicality and the Bishop prioritizing compassion and generosity.Persome worries about depleting their belongings and the potential consequences of the Bishop’s generosity. She values material possessions as essential for security and comfort, contrasting with the Bishop’s disregard for worldly wealth.
Persome doubts the sincerity of people seeking help, questioning their motives and fearing manipulation. This cautious approach clashes with the Bishop’s trust and acceptance, even towards strangers.

Q6. Discuss the qualities of the Bishop.
Ans. Unwavering generosity: The Bishop readily gives away possessions to help others, even sacrificing their own comfort and security. This generosity stems from a deep empathy and concern for those in need, a stark contrast to Persome’s focus on self-preservation.

Trust and faith in humanity: The Bishop believes in the innate goodness of people and their potential for change. He readily offers help and forgiveness, even to the convict, showcasing a trusting nature that clashes with Persome’s skepticism.

Focus on spiritual and long-term benefits: The Bishop’s actions are driven by faith and a belief in the positive long-term consequences of his generosity, regardless of immediate returns. This contrasts with Persome’s practicality and fixation on immediate needs and consequences.

Q7. What is the theme of the play?
Ans. The theme of “The Bishop’s Candlesticks” revolves around the transformative power of compassion, forgiveness, and redemption. Some of the themes explored in the play are

1. The power of compassion: The Bishop’s unwavering compassion, extending even to a hardened criminal like the convict, sets the stage for transformation. His kindness and understanding challenge societal prejudices and offer the convict a chance to break free from his past.
2. Forgiveness and redemption: The Bishop’s act of forgiving the convict not only liberates him from his guilt but also sparks the potential for redemption. The play suggests that even the most lost souls can find a path towards personal growth and positive change.
3. Faith in humanity: The Bishop’s unwavering faith in the inherent goodness of humans, even amidst despair, is a critical theme. He sees beyond the convict’s crime and recognizes the potential for good within him, inspiring belief in second chances.
4. Challenging societal norms: The play subtly critizes societal prejudices and fear towards those deemed criminals or outsiders. The Bishop’s open house stands as a symbol of inclusivity and challenges preconceived notions about who deserves compassion and grace.

Q8. What do the candlesticks symbolize?
Ans. The candlesticks in “The Bishop’s Candlesticks” symbolize-

  • Material wealth and societal priorities: Initially, they represent materialism and societal emphasis on possessions. The Bishop values them as it was given to him by his mother at her deathbed. 
  • Light and hope: Candles typically symbolize light and hope. The candlesticks, therefore, can represent the transformative power of kindness and the hope for change within the convict.
  • Sacrifice and redemption: By sacrificing the candlesticks to help the convict, the Bishop embodies the theme of sacrifice for a greater good. This act foreshadows the convict’s potential path towards redemption.

Q9. Summarize the plot of the play.
Ans. The play is about a convict who was arrested because he stole food for his ailing wife. He was put in jail where he was tortured and treated like an animal. He ran away from the ‘hell’ and broke into the Bishop’s house. The convict enters with a long knife and seizes the Bishop from behind. He warns the Bishop not to play any trick with him. The Bishop provides the convict some food to eat.
When left alone, the convict sees the silver candlesticks. He steals the candlesticks and goes out into the darkness.On the way, he is caught by the police.
When Persome and the Bishop get up next morning, they find the candlesticks and the convict missing. Soon they hear a knocking. A sergeant enters with three soldiers and the convict in chains.The Bishop saved the convict by telling the police that those candlesticks were a gift from him. This act of the Bishop transformed the convict. He now believed that the spirit of God dwells in the heart of every human being.

Q10. The Convict goes to Paris, sells the silver candlesticks and starts a business. The business prospers and he starts a reformatory for ex-convicts. He writes a letter to the Bishop telling him of this reformatory and seeks his blessings.
As the convict, John, write a letter to the Bishop.

Ans. ABC Lane
Paris
23 December, 2023

Dear Bishop,
It’s been years since that moonlit night that changed my life, years since I last stood in your warm, open doorway.Remember those silver candlesticks? The ones I stole in a moment of ravenous hunger, a desperate bid for survival clawing at a hardened heart? Well, they’re gone now, melted down into the veins of Paris.
With your kindness etched in my soul, urging me not towards darkness, but towards redemption. I toiled, my hands learning the rhythm of honest labor, sweat washing away the stains of the past. I also opened a rehabilitation centre called “Candle”, a refuge for shadows like mine.
May your Christmas be filled with the warmth of a thousand candles, each flicker mirroring the hope you ignited in a hardened heart.

With eternal gratitude and humbled heart,
John

 

 
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