A Dog Named Duke

 

CBSE Class 9 English Chapter 2 A Dog Named Duke Summary, Explanation, Question Answers from Literature Reader (Communicative) Book

 
A Dog Named Duke Class 9 – CBSE Class 9 English Literature Reader (Communicative) Book Lesson 2 A Dog Named Duke Summary and Detailed explanation of the lesson along with the meanings of difficult words. Also, the explanation is followed by a Summary of the lesson. All the exercises and Questions and Answers given at the back of the lesson have been covered. 


 

 

Class-9, English Literature Reader (Communicative) Chapter 2 – A Dog Named Duke

 

by William D. Ellis

 
 

A Dog Named Duke Introduction

This story is about a young man named Chuck Hooper, who got paralysed in an accident, and his bond with his dog Duke.
 

 
 

Video Explanation of A Dog Named Duke


 

 
 

A Dog Named Duke Summary

Chuck Hooper was a tall, slim man. He was a University level football player and the Zone Sales Manager in a chemical company. He got a Doberman named Duke as a pet dog much against his wife’s wish. One evening on his way back home, Hooper met with an accident. He was partially paralyzed and remained in the hospital for six weeks. Duke was sent to the kennel as there was no one to look after it. Upon his return, Hooper became lonely and depressed. Duke was brought home and was glad to see his master. It could make out that everything was not the same with its master. Duke lied on the floor next to Hooper’s bed all the time. dogGradually, both of them got bored and Duke started asking his master to get up. One day, Hooper tied the leash to Duke’s collar and the dog got very excited. He pulled the leash and finally, Hooper had to get up from his bed. Duke pulled the leash and Hooper took a step. Gradually, as days passed by, they continued this exercise. Hooper had to make an effort to walk. Within a week they had reached the entrance of the house. The neighbours would watch this daily exercise. Hooper’s wife Marcy also noticed her husband’s improvement and what the dog did for him. Hooper walked from the clinic to his office alone which showed his progress. He joined the office and gradually started working full day. The walking exercise with Duke continued. Hooper was promoted as Regional Manager of the company. The Hoopers shifted house and the new neighbourhood was unaware of Chuck and Duke’s story. One evening, as they had guests over, they heard the screech of brakes and Hooper thought of Duke. To their disappointment, Duke had been hit by a car. Marcy lifted it and took it to a doctor but the dog could not be saved. The dog had fulfilled his duty for his master. It was a thanksgiving to Duke – a letter of promotion for Chuck Hooper as the Assistant National Sales Manager of the company.

 

 
 

A Dog Named Duke Lesson Explanation

 

In 1953, Hooper was a favoured young man. A big genuine grin civilised his highly competitive nature. Standing six-foot-one, he’d played on the university football team. He was already a hard-charging Zone Sales Manager for a chemical company. Everything was going for him.

favoured: someone or something who is preferred or recommended by the majority

genuine: sincere, truthful

grin: smile while showing some teeth

civilised: polite and well-mannered

hard-charging: ambitious and determined

It was the year 1953, when a young man named Hooper was someone who was recommended by the majority of the people. He had a big sincere grin on his face, which made him look polite and well-mannered. This hid his highly competitive nature. His height was six feet and one inch. He played in the football team of his university. Hooper was a very ambitious and determined Zone Sales Manager for a chemical company, an achievement at a young age. All of this made his future bright and everyone believed that he would definitely be a highly successful person in future because he had everything a man could aspire for.

 

Then, when he was driving home one autumn twilight, a car sped out in front of

him without warning. Hooper was taken to the hospital with a subdural

haemorrhage in the motor section of the brain, completely paralysing his left

side.

twilight: the period of the evening when twilight is visible, between daylight and darkness, dusk, sunset

subdural haemorrhage:  a serious condition where blood collects between the skull and the surface of the brain caused by a head injury

haemorrhage: heavy bleeding

motor: something which causes or controls movement

paralysing: causing a person or part of the body to become partly or wholly incapable of movement

One day, Hooper was driving home. It was the autumn season and it was the sunset time of the day. Suddenly, a car came in front of him, at a fast speed, without warning. It resulted in a car accident. Hooper was taken to the hospital with a big head injury. He had a serious condition where blood had collected between the skull and the surface of the brain. He had heavy bleeding. The head injury was on a particular part of the brain, the motor section. The motor section of the brain controls the movement of the entire body. As a result of the head injury, his left side was completely paralysed, meaning that he could not move or could not control the movement of the left side of his body.

One of Chuck’s district managers drove Marcy to the hospital. Her husband couldn’t talk; he could only breathe and see, and his vision was double. Marcy phoned a neighbour, asking him to put Duke in a kennel.
Hooper remained on the critical list for a month. After the fifth week some men from his company came to the hospital and told Hooper to take a year off. They would create a desk job for him at the headquarters.

kennel: a small shelter for dogs

Marcy is Chuck Hooper’s wife. Chuck had many district managers in the company he was working in. One of those managers took Marcy in a car and drove to the hospital where her husband had been taken. She learned that her husband could not talk. He could only breathe and see everything and everyone around him. His vision was not clear and everything he was seeing was doubled. She then phoned her neighbour, asking him to take Duke the pet dog out from the house and put him in another shelter because no one was there to look after him.

Hooper was in a dangerous state for a month. After five weeks of the accident, some people from his office visited him and asked him to take a year’s leave from work. They added that the company would create a sitting job for him at the company’s main office.   

About six weeks after the accident, the hospital put him in a wheelchair. Every day there was someone working his paralysed arm and leg followed by baths, exercise and a wheeled wheeled walkerwalker. However, Chuck didn’t make much headway. 

In March, they let him out of the hospital. After the excitement of homecoming wore off, Chuck hit a new low. At the hospital there had been other injured people, but now, each morning when Marcy quietly went to work, it was like a gate slamming down. Duke was still in the kennel, and Chuck was alone with his thoughts.

make headway: make progress

homecoming: an instance of returning home

Hooper remained in the hospital for six weeks. After six weeks, he was put in a wheelchair. There was a person with Hooper who would help him bathe, exercise and control the wheelchair. However, he did not make much progress and it seemed as if his paralysis would take forever to be cured. Then, in the month of March, he was brought back home. Hooper was filled with the excitement of coming back home. But soon after the excitement had gradually died down, he again became sad and depressed. He felt lonely. In the hospital, there were other people or patients with whom he could talk. But at home, Marcy would quietly go to work and Duke was still in the kennel, and so he would be left all alone. Everytime Marcy went to work, he felt like there was a gate shutting down on him because he couldn’t go out, and he didn’t have anyone to talk to.

Finally, they decided to bring Duke home. Chuck said he wanted to be standing when Duke came in, so they stood him up. Duke’s nails were long from four months’ confinement, and when he spied Chuck he stood quivering like 5000 volts; then he let out a bellow, spun his long-nailed wheels, and launched himself across three metres of air. He was a 23-kilo missile of joy. He hit Chuck above the belt, causing him to fight to keep his balance.

confinement: the state of being captivated in a small place

quiver: tremble or shake with a slight rapid motion

bellow: deep loud roar

Then they decided that it was time to bring Duke back home. Chuck expressed his wish that he wanted to be in the standing position when his pet dog finally returned home. He did not wish Duke to see him in a wheelchair. So, the people helped him stand up. On the other hand, Duke’s nails had grown during the time when he was in the shelter, and had turned into long claws. When he saw Chuck, he trembled so much that it seemed like someone was giving him a strong electric shock of 5000 volts. He gave a deep loud roar. His long-nailed hands are referred to as wheels which started spinning as he ran towards his owner. He jumped upon Hooper by launching himself across three metres of air. Chuck Hooper felt like Duke was a missile of joy, who weighed 23 kilograms. Duke hit Chuck at the end of his torso which is above his belt or waist. This put a lot of pressure on his body and he struggled not to loose his balance. He tried his best to not fall from the weight and pressure of the dog hitting him.

Those who saw it said the dog knew instantly. He never jumped on Chuck again. From that moment, he took up a post beside his master’s bed round the clock. 

But even Duke’s presence didn’t reach Chuck. The once-iron muscles slacked on the rangy frame. Secretly, Marcy cried as she watched the big man’s grin fade away. Severe face lines set in like cement as Chuck stared at the ceiling for hours, then out of the window, then at Duke.

post: assigned position

slack: not held tightly in the proper position, saggy

rangy: tall and slim with long, slender limbs

frame: figure

There were many people at Chuck Hooper’s house when they saw the reunion of the dog and his owner. They told the others that when the dog hit Chuck above the waist, the dog knew immediately that his master was not okay. He could understand that he was not supposed to jump at him. He never jumped on Chuck from the day onwards. After that realisation, he assigned himself as the bodyguard or protector of Chuck Hooper and positioned himself beside his master’s bed. Throughout the day, he would stand there only. However, this reduced the cheerful, happy nature of the dog, and soon, Chuck started feeling lonely again even though Duke was right beside him all the time. Gradually, this loneliness started to affect his physical appearance. Marcy cried secretly as she saw the young man’s big grin fade away. He got severe face lines which appeared as if they would never soften, like cement. He kept on staring at the ceiling, then the window, and then the dog. This would go on for hours and hours.

dukeWhen two fellows stare at each other day in, day out, and one can’t move and the other can’t talk, boredom sets in. Duke finally couldn’t take it. From a motionless coil on the floor he’d spring to his feet, quivering with impatience. 

“Ya-ruff” 

“Lie down. Duke!”

The two fellows here are Chuck Hooper and Duke. They could only stare at each other all day. They could not play because Hooper was paralysed and could not move, and they could not talk because Duke, who was a dog, could not talk. This resulted in boredom, which Duke could not bear anymore. One day, Duke who was lying like a coil which did not move, jumped up as if he had springs attached to his feet, and he was shaking with fast motions. He was trembling because he was impatient and he wanted to interact with his master. He barked at Hooper and Hooper told him to lie down.

 

Duke stalked to the bed, poked his pointed nose under Chuck’s elbow and lifted. He nudged and needled and snorted.

“Go run around the house, Duke.”

But Duke wouldn’t. He’d lie down with a reproachful eye on Hooper. An hour later he would come over to the bed again and yap and poke. He wouldn’t leave but just sit there.

stalk: stride somewhere in a proud, stiff, or angry manner

poke: thrust (something, such as one’s head) in a particular direction

nudge: to poke and prod (someone) gently with one’s elbow in order to attract attention

needle: to annoy someone

snort: make a sudden explosive sound through one’s nose to express indignation

reproachful: expressing disapproval or disappointment
yap: give a sharp, shrill bark

Duke then walked to Chuck’s bed and he was angry at him. He pushed his pointed nose under Chuck’s elbow and then lifted his head in an attempt to lift Chuck’s elbow. He poked Chuck in order to get his attention. He tried to annoy Chuck so that he would get irritated and finally stand up to stop the dog from annoying him. He made sudden explosive sounds through his nose, which indicated his indignation towards Chuck. Chuck told him to go around the house. However, Duke did not listen to him. Instead, he lied down while giving Hooper a look which showed his disappointment at Hooper. After doing that for an hour, he got up, went to the bed, and started poking and barking in a sharp and shrill manner. 

 

One evening Chuck’s good hand idly hooked the leash onto Duke’s collar to hold him still. It was like lighting a fuse: Duke shimmied himself U-shaped in anticipation. Even Hooper can’t explain his next move. He asked Marcy to help him to his feet. Duke pranced, Chuck fought for balance. With his good hand, he placed the leash in his left and folded the paralysed fingers over it, holding them there. Then he leaned forward. With Marcy supporting him by the elbow, he moved his right leg out in front. Straightening his right leg caused the left foot to drag forward, alongside the right. It could be called a step.

idly: in an aimless or lazy way

hook: attach or fasten with a hook or hooks

shimmy: shake or vibrate abnormally

anticipation: expectation, hope

prance:  move with high springy steps

One evening, Chuck’s hand, which was not paralysed, attached the hook of the leash to the dog’s collar so that Duke would remain still. It was like he had ignited a fuse because Duke reacted energetically. Duke vibrated in a strange way and he made turned into U-shape in the hope that his master would finally get up. Even Hooper could not understand his next move and why he did it. He asked his wife Marcy to help him get up. Duke moved with a spring in his feet, while Chuck struggled to balance. With the hand which was not paralysed, he put the leash in his left or paralysed hand, and folded his paralysed fingers over it. Then he leaned forward. Marcy was supporting him by holding him by his elbow. Due to the support Marcy was providing him, he was able to move his right leg out in the front. When he straightened his right leg, the left or the paralysed leg automatically dragged or moved forward. He was able to put his left leg alongside his right leg. This meant that he had just taken a step forward. 

Duke felt the sudden slack in the leash and pulled it taut. Chuck swayed forward again, broke the fall with his good right leg, then straightened. Thrice he did that, then collapsed into the wheelchair, exhausted.

Next day, the big dog started early; he charged around to Hooper’s good side, jabbed his nose under the elbow and snapped his head up. The big man’s good arm reached for the leash. With Hooper standing, the dog walked to the end of the leash and tugged steadily. Four so-called steps they took that day.

slack: the part of a rope or line which is not held taut; the loose or unused part

taut: tight, firm

sway: swing, move from side-to-side

collapsed into: to fall abruptly and completely

jab: poke sharply

snap: to move or carry out an action with brisk or rapid movement

tug: pull

steadily: in a controlled manner

When Chuck completed one step, Duke felt like the rope was being loosely held. He wanted his master to walk further and so he pulled the leash so that it was being stretched and tightened. This caused Chuck to swing forward. He was able to break his fall with his right, working leg and then he straightened up. He did that three times in one day, which was a great achievement for someone who could not move at all. However, he became very tired due to this exercise, and he fell abruptly and completely into the wheelchair (it was abrupt or sudden because his body suddenly refused to stand up anymore). Next day, Duke woke up early in the morning because he was excited to do the previous day’s exercise again. He went to Hooper’s side which was not paralysed in full speed. He sharply poked his nose under the elbow of the working arm. Duke woke him up with brisk movement. After Chuck woke up, his working arm reached for the leash and he stood up. When the dog felt that Hooper was standing, he walked to the end of the leash and pulled in a controlled manner, meaning that he was not pulling too slow or pulling too fast. Chuck was able to take four steps that day.

Hooper and Duke

Leaning back against the pull, Hooper learned to keep his balance without Marcy at his elbow. Wednesday, he and Duke took five steps; Thursday, six steps; Friday, failure- two steps followed by exhaustion. But in two weeks they reached the front porch.

front porch: entrance hall

Hooper soon learned to maintain his balance without Marcy holding his elbow for extra support. He did this by leaning back against the pull of the leash. This indicated that he was slowly becoming more and more independent. On Wednesday, he walked five steps and on Thursday, he walked six steps. On Friday, he failed as he could not walk more than two steps and he got tired very easily. However, in two weeks, he progressed so much that he and Duke reached the entrance hall of the house.

 

By mid-April neighbours saw a daily struggle in front of Marcy’s house. Out on the sidewalk they saw the dog pull his leash taut then stand and wait. The man would drag himself abreast of the dog, then the dog would surge out to the end of the leash and wait again. The pair set daily goals; Monday, the sixth fence post, Tuesday, the seventh fence post, Wednesday ……

abreast: side by side and facing the same way

surge out: to burst forward

It was the middle of the month of April. Chuck had made so much progress that he could now be seen walking in front of the house. The neighbours saw him try everyday. They saw the dog pull the leash and then wait for the man to take another step. Chuck walked side by side with the dog. When another step was taken, the dog would burst out in the forward direction and wait again for his master to take more steps. They set daily goals for themselves. On Monday, their goal was to reach the sixth pole on the fence. On Tuesday the seventh pole and so on.

 

When Marcy saw what Duke could do for her husband, she told the doctor, who prescribed a course of physiotherapy with weights, pulleys and whirlpool baths and above all walking every day with Duke, on a limited, gradual scale.

By now neighbours on their street were watching the pattern of progress. On June 1, news spread that Hooper and Duke had made it to an intersection quite far away.

prescribe: advise and authorise the use of a medicine or treatment for someone, especially in writing

physiotherapy: the treatment of disease, injury, or deformity by physical methods such as massage, heat treatment, and exercise rather than by drugs or surgery

whirlpool bath: a heated pool in which hot aerated water is continuously circulated

gradual: slowly increasing

Marcy saw how Duke was helping her husband and she told the doctor about it. The doctor then wrote a course of a particular treatment which included only exercise with weights, pulleys and baths in a heated pool of hot aerated water instead of drugs and surgeries. He also included walking everyday with Duke. However, he set a limit for each and every treatment, because fast treatment would only result in tiredness.

 

Soon, Duke began campaigning for two trips a day, and they lengthened the targets, one driveway at a time. Duke no longer waited at each step.

On January 4, Hooper made his big move. Without Duke, he walked the 200 metres from the clinic to the local branch office of his company. This had been one of the district offices under his jurisdiction as zone manager. The staff was amazed by the visit. But to Gordon Doule, the Manager, Chuck said, “Gordon, this isn’t just a visit. Bring me up to date on what’s happened, will you-so I can get to work?” Doule gaped, “It’ll just be an hour a day for a while,” Hooper continued. “I’ll use that empty desk in the warehouse. And I’ll need a dictating machine.”

campaign: work in an organised and active way towards a particular goal

driveway: a short road leading from a public road to a house or other building

jurisdiction: the official power to make legal decisions and judgements.

gape: stare in shock

warehouse: a large building where raw materials or manufactured goods may be stored prior to their distribution for sale.

dictating machine: : a machine used especially for the recording of human speech for transcription

They then started to work in an organised and active way towards their goal. They took two trips a day with longer targets and one driveway at a time. Duke now did not wait at each step. On 4th of January, Hooper made a big move. He walked 200 metres from the clinic to the local branch office of the company where he used to work, without Duke. The local branch office had once been one of the district offices under his power when he was the zone manager. The staff i.e. the rest of the people working there were amazed by his visit. He told the manager of the office, whose name was Gordon Doule, that he was not just visiting. He wanted him to tell him what all had happened till date so that he could get back to work. Doule stared at him in shock because visiting was just one thing but willing to get back to work so soon was truly amazing. Chuck also said that he would be working for an hour a day for the time being. He would use the empty desk which was kept in another large building, used for storage. He also said that he need a machine which could record his speech as he could not type for now.

 

Back in the company’s headquarters, Chuck’s move presented problems — tough ones. When a man fights that hard for a comeback, who wants to tell him he can’t handle his old job? On the other hand, what can you do with a salesman who can’t move around, and can work only an hour a day? They didn’t know that Hooper had already set his next objective: March 1, a full day’s work.

comeback: a return by a well-known person, especially an entertainer or sports player, to the activity in which they have formerly been successful.

objective: aim

When Chuck got back to work, he faced some new problems. These problems were mentally challenging. While Chuck was fighting hard for a return, some people felt like he would fail to do so because according to them, his paralysed self could not handle the job. Some people also felt like Chuck would be a burden because he could not move around and could work for only one hour a day. However, people were unaware of Hooper’s determination. He had already set a new aim for himself – to do a full day’s work on 1st of March.

 

Chuck hit the target, and after March 1, there was no time for the physiotherapy programme; he turned completely to Duke, who pulled him along the street faster and faster, increasing his stability and endurance. Sometimes, walking after dark, Hooper would trip and fall. Duke would stand still as a post while his master struggled to get up. It was as though the dog knew that his job was to get Chuck back on his feet.

endurance: the ability to endure harsh conditions

Chuck was able to complete the task and after March 1, he stopped doing his physiotherapy and became dependent on Duke, who pulled him down the street with steadily increasing speed. This built up Chuck’s stability and strength. Sometimes, when they would walk when it was dark, Hooper would be unable to see where he was going and he would get stuck and fall. That time, Duke would stand as still as a post while Chuck would struggle to get back up to his feet. The dog’s behaviour made it look like he knew that it was his job to get Chuck back on his feet.

 

Thirteen months from the moment he worked full days. Chuck Hooper was promoted to regional manager covering more than four states.

Chuck, Marcy and Duke moved house in March 1956. The people in the new suburb where the Hoopers bought a house didn’t know the story of Chuck and Duke. All they knew was that their new neighbour walked like a struggling mechanical giant and that he was always pulled by a rampageous dog that acted as if he owned the man.

promote: to raise someone to a higher rank

suburb: an outlying district of a city, especially a residential one

giant: a living being who is humongous as compared to the other living beings

rampageous: someone who is uncontrollably violent

After thirteen months, he was raised to a higher rank. He was now a regional manager of more than four states. It was the month of March of the year 1956 when Chuck, Marcy and Duke moved to a new house. They moved to an outlying district of the city, where people did not know the story of Chuck’s accident and how Duke had helped Chuck. They knew only a few things based on their observations – Chuck struggled to walk which made him look like a big and tall robot and Chuck was pulled by Duke in such a violent way that it seemed as if the dog owned the man.

 

On the evening of October 12, 1957, the Hoopers had guests. Suddenly over the babble of voices, Chuck heard the screech of brakes outside. Instinctively, he looked for Duke.

They carried the big dog into the house. Marcy took one look at Duke’s breathing, at his brown eyes with the stubbornness gone. “Phone the vet,” she said. “Tell him, I’m bringing Duke.” Several people jumped to lift the dog. “No, please,” she said. And she picked up the big Duke, carried him gently to the car and drove him to the animal hospital.

babble: talk rapidly and continuously in such a way that someone else cannot understand what the person or people are talking about

screech: make a loud, harsh, squealing noise

instinctively: without conscious thought; by natural instinct

stubbornness: the ability to be stubborn or iron-willed

veterinarian: the doctor who treats animals.

Another year had passed. It was 1957 and the date was October 12. The Hoopers i.e. Chuck and Marcy were having guests at their home. The people were talking so fast and continuously that an outsider would have been unable to understand what they were talking about. Suddenly, Chuck heard the loud and harsh squealing noise of brakes over the noise of the talking of the guests. He remembered that Duke was outside. Without thinking much, he started looking for Duke. He found it on the road. He was carried into the house. Marcy took one look at Duke’s breathing and saw that the look which made the dog look stubborn had gone. She asked the people to call the veterinarian, the doctor who treats animals. She also asked the people to tell the doctor that she was bringing Duke to the clinic. Several people were about to lift the dog when Marcy told them not to do so. She picked Duke herself, carried him gently to the car and drove to the animal hospital. 

 

Duke was drugged and he made it until 11o’clock the next morning, but his injuries were too severe.

People who knew the distance Chuck and Duke had come together, one fence post at a time, now watched the big man walk alone day after day. They wondered: how long will he keep it up? How far will he go today? Can he do it alone?

drugged: to be given medicine or drugs

severe: fatal

At the animal hospital, the doctor injected some drugs into the dog which gave him the power to live till 11 o’clock the next morning. However, his injuries were so deep and fatal that he could not survive anymore. People who knew the story of Chuck and Duke and how they walked together one fence post at a time now watched Chuck walk alone. They wondered many things – how long would he be able to live without Duke, how far would he go, and if he could do it alone.

 

A few weeks ago, worded as if in special tribute to Duke, an order came through from the chemical company’s headquarters: “………. Therefore, to advance our objectives step by step, Charles Hooper is appointed the Assistant National Sales Manager.”

tribute: an act, statement, or gift that is intended to show gratitude, respect, or admiration

A few weeks later, an order came from the main headquarters of the company. The order was like an act intended to show gratitude and respect to Duke. The order stated that Chuck or Charles Hooper was to become the Assistant National Sales Manager. He had been promoted and he felt that this was a note of thanks to Duke for his effort towards Chuck.
 

 
 

A Dog Named Duke Question and Answers

 

  1. Based on your reading of the story answer the following questions by choosing the correct option

(a) With reference to Hooper, the author says, “Everything was going for him”, What does it imply?

(i) he had everything that a man aspires for.

(ii) people admired him.

(iii) he did what he wanted.

(iv) he was capable of playing games.

Ans. (i) he had everything that a man aspires for.

 

(b) Duke never jumped on Chuck again because ________________

(i) Duke was paralysed and unable to jump.

(ii) Chuck was angry with Duke for jumping at him.

(iii) Duke realized that Chuck was not well and could not balance himself.

(iv) Marcy did not allow Duke to come near Chuck.

Ans. (iii) Duke realized that Chuck was not well and could not balance himself.

 

(c) The author says that Duke ‘knew his job’. The job was ________________

(i) to look after Chuck.

(ii) to get Chuck on his feet.

(iii) to humour Chuck

(iv) to guard the house.

Ans. (ii) to get Chuck on his feet

 

(d) “________ even Duke’s presence didn’t reach Chuck “. Why?

(i) Duke was locked in his kennel and Chuck couldn’t see him.

(ii) Duke hid himself behind the bed post.

(iii) Duke had come to know that Hooper was not well.

(iv) Hooper was lost in his own grief and pain.

Ans. (iv) Hooper was lost in his own grief and pain.

 

  1. Answer the following questions briefly

a) In 1953, Hooper was a favoured young man. Explain.

Ans. Hooper was a football player in the University and had a job as a Sales Manager in a chemical company. This shows that he was good at his work and so was chosen for these jobs. Hence, he was favoured or preferred.

 

b) They said that they would create a desk job for Hooper at the headquarters.

i) Who are ‘they’?

ii) Why did they decide to do this?

Ans. i) ‘They’ refers to the seniors of Hooper at the chemical company where he worked.

ii) Hooper had been paralysed after the accident and remained in hospital for five weeks when they met him. They decided this as he would not be able to move around and so a sitting job would be better for him.

 

c) Duke was an extraordinary dog. What special qualities did he exhibit to justify this?

Discuss.

Ans. Duke was an extraordinary dog with special qualities, when Duke came from the kennel, he jumped on Chuck and he knew instantly that he was never to jump on him again. From that moment, he sat beside his master’s bed. Duke encouraged his master to get up by poking his nose under his elbow and lifting it up. Finally, Chuck and Duke began walking together with Duke pulling the leash and holding it tightly so that Chuck could be supported and take one step forward. What began as one step at a time resulted in Chuck walking by himself. It was Duke’s effort which revived Chuck Hooper.

 

d) What problems did Chuck present when he returned to the company headquarters?

Ans. Chuck Hooper could not work as he used to do before the accident. He faced problems as he could not move around and working for an hour a day was not sufficient for the job.

 

e) Why do you think Charles Hooper’s appointment as Assistant National Sales Manager can be considered to be a tribute to Duke?

Ans. Hooper’s appointment as Assistant National Sales Manager is considered to be a tribute to Duke because he was able to achieve this promotion due to Duke’s persistent efforts. Duke’s dedication indicated that he considered it to be his duty to revive Chuck and so Chuck’s achievement is an appropriate tribute to Duke.

 

g) ‘Small wins help achieve big goals.’ Support, with evidence from the text, to show how this applies to Chuck.

Ans. In this chapter, we see how seriously injured Chuck was due to the car accident. Everyone including him thought his comeback to be impossible. However, one day, Duke helped him stand up which was a small win for him as it helped him realise that there was still hope for him. After that, he campaigned daily targets for him as his objectives. Soon, he was able to walk outside his home, and he walked from one fence post to another. These small wins added up, and helped him achieve a big goal at the end, which was to be appointed as the Assistant National Sales Manager in the chemical company.

 

Q. The following dates were important in Charles Hooper’s life in some way. Complete the table by relating the given details with the correct dates.

 

January 4, March 1, June 1, October 12

 

Date Description
News spread that Hooper and Duke had made it to an intersection
Hooper walked independently from the clinic to the branch office
Hooper planned to start a full day’s work at office
Duke met with a fatal accident

 

Ans.

 

DateDescription
June 1News spread that Hooper and Duke had made it to an intersection
January 4Hooper walked independently from the clinic to the branch office
March 1Hooper planned to start a full day’s work at office
October 12Duke met with a fatal accident